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Fighting Invasive Fish With Forks and Knives

samzenpus posted about 4 months ago | from the don't-forget-the-tartar dept.

Earth 180

An anonymous reader writes NPR commentator Bonny Wolf has a unique solution to battle the threat of invasive fish species in our waterways. She proposes we fight them with a knife, fork, and a few lemon wedges. From the article: "Take the northern snakehead, which has made its way into tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. It competes with native species for food, and then eats the native species, not to mention the odd frog or bird, with its mouthful of sharp teeth. It's been called "Fishzilla." It breeds fast, has no natural predators and can grow to be 4 feet long. The northern snakehead hangs out in grassy shallows, making it hard to catch. But a couple of years ago, Maryland started promoting the snakehead as an eating fish. Its harvest has increased from zero to 5,000 pounds a year."

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What kind of fish? (5, Funny)

statusbar (314703) | about 4 months ago | (#47692899)

I think the fish accidentally a word there with its mouthful of teeth!

What kind of fish? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47692907)

Samzenpus, what is it you'd say you do around here? Fish is Northern Snakehead

Re:What kind of fish? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693147)

Fish is Northern Snakehead

Oh, is that all?

I thought it might be a species of Candleja...

The Comma Fish (5, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | about 4 months ago | (#47692957)

closely related to the silverback semicolon, but watch out for those pointy asterisks

Re:What kind of fish? (5, Interesting)

istartedi (132515) | about 4 months ago | (#47692975)

Those are the fish that can move 1/4 mile across dry land to find new places to live. It probably crawled out of water and ate that word out of the summary.

Re:What kind of fish? (1)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 4 months ago | (#47693735)

Those are the fish that can move 1/4 mile across dry land to find new places to live.

Well, that sounds like their weak point. Maybe we need to have Springfield Snakefish Days when it's dry and go around clubbing them?

The summary says that they hang out in shallow, grassy waters. Some geek fisher here must have some techie ideas involving radar and shotguns that should help the problem.

Re:What kind of fish? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693205)

I eated it with forks and knives and lemons! yum yum!

Re:What kind of fish? (5, Funny)

flyneye (84093) | about 4 months ago | (#47693497)

We have an overabundance of carp here. Normally eating carp seems to be an ethnic thing around here.Even then, only an older generation bothers with it. I would like the world to come and rid the Mid U.S. of carp, so I have included the only recipe I know for carp.
        1 pressure cooker
          1 5-lb. rock
          1 carp
          Pressure cook the meat till it slips from the bone (about 2 hours) let cool, discard the fish and eat the rock.

Re:What kind of fish? (3, Interesting)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | about 4 months ago | (#47694659)

I like my method of turning carp into something delicious better:
1. Catch the carp
2. load up ~100lbs of carp in the back of the jeep in a big plastic tub
3. dig a big hold in the garden
4. bury carp in the garden
They make a wonderful fertilizer. I also do the same thing with the little crappy bullheads from the pond that is full of sheep field run off near my house.

Re:What kind of fish? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47694927)

1) Put carp in blender
2) Press excess liquid out of the meat slurry
3) Pour carp slurry into ice-cube trays
4) Freeze carp cubes
5) Batter and crumb-coat frozen carp cubes
6) Deep fry carp cubes

Alternatively (and more realistically):
1) Put carp in blender
2) Press excess liquid out of the meat slurry
3) Put meat slurry in cans and sell it as cat food

This really seems like the sort of environmental "rape and plunder" operation that humans are uniquely suited for. The difference being that getting rid of the carp from North American rivers would be a good thing.

Re:What kind of fish? (1)

complete loony (663508) | about 4 months ago | (#47695007)

Bored while camping, my family started spear fishing with garden forks in knee deep reeds. Caught about 40 carp, buried them in someone's garden for fertiliser.

Re:What kind of fish? (5, Funny)

guises (2423402) | about 4 months ago | (#47693481)

Bizarrely, I am encouraged that so many posts are pointing out the missing name. "Wow," I'm saying to myself, "The first three posts are all by people who have read the summary and not just the title." A tiny victory for intelligent discourse.

Maybe I'm setting the bar too low.

Re:What kind of fish? (5, Funny)

slashdice (3722985) | about 4 months ago | (#47694037)

Yeah, except the one guy who was paid to read the summary didn't.

Re:What kind of fish? (4, Funny)

jeffmeden (135043) | about 4 months ago | (#47695001)

Yeah, except the one guy who was paid to read the summary didn't.

What better way to have truly objective reporting, than editors who have no idea what's even in the story before they greenlight it! It's the ultimate in fair and balanced journalism.

Re:What kind of fish? (0)

NotDrWho (3543773) | about 4 months ago | (#47694253)

Obviously you've never tasted the delicious "," fish. My mouth is watering just thinking about it.

Re:What kind of fish? (5, Funny)

Tyrannicsupremacy (1354431) | about 4 months ago | (#47694567)

A fish so terrible it must not be named!!!

Re:What kind of fish? (1)

flanders123 (871781) | about 4 months ago | (#47694847)

I see what the editors did there. This clearly was a ploy to trick us into reading TFA. Very clever. Almost as clever as the tasty northern snakehead fish. Good thing I caught it and refuse to RTFA like any true slashdotter!

Take the , (1, Insightful)

ireallyhateslashdot (2297290) | about 4 months ago | (#47692903)

Take the what? Is this my browser? I don't know what the hell you're talking about.

Re: Take the , (-1, Troll)

Tandava Nadesan (3623123) | about 4 months ago | (#47692911)

Take the Muslim I think

Re:Take the , (5, Funny)

Trogre (513942) | about 4 months ago | (#47692995)

Clearly it's the rare but apparently also invasive comma-fish, often abbreviated as the ,

Re:Take the , (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693247)

Perhaps they meant evasive species.

Re:Take the , (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693013)

Take the what?

A girl, when in doubt, always take a girl.

Re:Take the , (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693085)

Take her where?

Re:Take the , (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693175)

Fishing

Re:Take the , (2)

Rei (128717) | about 4 months ago | (#47694145)

I let Google Autocomplete it for me to try to figure out. Most were mundane, like "Take the money and run", but I have to say, I was pretty boggled by Google's suggestion of "Take the skinheads bowling". ;)

Take the ??? (1, Funny)

corychristison (951993) | about 4 months ago | (#47692921)

1. Take the ???.
2. ???
3. Profit!

Genius.

"Promoting" how? (5, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 4 months ago | (#47692923)

Does "promoting" mean passing out some posters or getting rid of the requirement to purchase a fishing license from the State to keep the northern snakehead? There are plenty of folks out of work who could help here in a win-win situation. We already have systems in place to police the fish that people keep and removing all restrictions on invasive species taking would go a long way towards reducing their populations.

Re: "Promoting" how? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693319)

Everyone point at the libertarian and laugh.

Encourage over fishing? (4, Interesting)

usuallylost (2468686) | about 4 months ago | (#47693979)

I agree that eating the invasive fish is a good idea. After all if we didn't put catch limits, and encourage catch and release, on the normal game fish people would have fished them to extinction. So really all we have to do is convince people they are good eating and then make no efforts to protect the invasive fish. My guess is once it gets going people will gleefully over fish them. Just have to make sure people stick to the undesirable fish.

I don't know about lion fish but both Asian carp and northern snakeheads are good to eat. They eat Asian carp extensively in China and the northern snakehead is commonly consumed in Thailand. I have seen them for sale in markets where the northern snakehead was stuffed with what looked like lemon grass, other herbs and covered in a layer of salt and then grilled. I never tried it simply because I am not keen on fish.

Re:Encourage over fishing? (2)

luis_a_espinal (1810296) | about 4 months ago | (#47694539)

I agree that eating the invasive fish is a good idea. After all if we didn't put catch limits, and encourage catch and release, on the normal game fish people would have fished them to extinction. So really all we have to do is convince people they are good eating and then make no efforts to protect the invasive fish. My guess is once it gets going people will gleefully over fish them. Just have to make sure people stick to the undesirable fish.

I don't know about lion fish but both Asian carp and northern snakeheads are good to eat. They eat Asian carp extensively in China and the northern snakehead is commonly consumed in Thailand. I have seen them for sale in markets where the northern snakehead was stuffed with what looked like lemon grass, other herbs and covered in a layer of salt and then grilled. I never tried it simply because I am not keen on fish.

A friend of mine regularly goes spear fishing after them. He swears they are tasty and good to eat. You just have to be careful with the spines when you clean these bad boys.

Creating demand? (1, Interesting)

YoungManKlaus (2773165) | about 4 months ago | (#47692941)

could that possibly go the wrong way because you create demand so later there will be an incentive to actually put _more_ invasive fish into the habitat?

Re:Creating demand? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693273)

This comment is invasively retarded. I mean I got stupider after reading it.

Re:Creating demand? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693325)

It's a verifiable fact that attaching an economic incentive to the eradication of an unwanted species has, in the past, been known to make the problem worse [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Creating demand? (1)

ihtoit (3393327) | about 4 months ago | (#47693855)

Two words: European rabbit.

Re:Creating demand? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693667)

Sure, if the problem is forgotten, that could happen, but still i would say that's a smaller risk than leaving it be, since otherwise there's not enough incentive to get rid of the invasive fish.

Re:Creating demand? (2)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 4 months ago | (#47694039)

could that possibly go the wrong way because you create demand so later there will be an incentive to actually put _more_ invasive fish into the habitat?

Even if, we'll probably overfish them, and it'll be save the snakeheads!

Like my mamma always taught me (4, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | about 4 months ago | (#47692955)

...sometimes all you have to do is eat the problem.

Re:Like my mamma always taught me (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693285)

Yes. Anyone got any good recipes for roast communist?

Yum. (4, Informative)

Rick in China (2934527) | about 4 months ago | (#47692971)

I've eaten this fish quite frequently in China, and it's actually quite tasty. I didn't realize it was so highly invasive, but some other fish (like Lionfish) seem to really f' up huge populations/ecosystems when they start to flourish where they don't belong, and I definitely agree that *eating them* is by far a better method than some other fish invasion control methods, like poisoning bodies of water and all adjacent bodies of water to kill everything.

These m'f'rs can actually wriggle over land for a few days out of water to expand their territory. That's badass.

Re:Yum. (1)

oobayly (1056050) | about 4 months ago | (#47693609)

It's not a bad idea - in the UK the grey squirrels introduced from North America have caused havoc with the native red squirrel, it turns out they're quite tasty too - a local restaurant serves shredded squirrel meat. Same (apparently) goes for the signal crayfish that were introduced here.

Re:Yum. (1)

ihtoit (3393327) | about 4 months ago | (#47693867)

yeeeah... just don't get caught fishing them out of the Serpentine (there is a company does it under some sort of royal charter), but you're OK trapping them in the Thames.

Re:Yum. (1)

Rei (128717) | about 4 months ago | (#47694199)

Part of the problem is that most restaurants and stores would rather serve farm-raise game animals than wild-killed game. So if you manage to develop a taste for a particular type of meat, people will often start farm raising them.

Re:Yum. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47694047)

It's very popular in Thailand as well. Has a lot of bones but is very delicious.

Re:Yum. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47694337)

These m'f'rs can actually wriggle over land for a few days out of water to expand their territory. That's badass.

Well, that's easy to solve. I propose we dig a moat around their habitat. After all, we have moats around castles that keep invasive people out of it. Right? Right??

An idea (4, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | about 4 months ago | (#47692973)

In the meantime, though, his official slogan for the fish is, "Malicious but delicious."

Hmmm, can we legalize cannibalism of politicians?

Re: An idea (5, Funny)

Type44Q (1233630) | about 4 months ago | (#47693019)

If the words out of their mouths are any indication, they're guaranteed to taste like shit.

Re: An idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693595)

Open up a new H1B class for politicians.

Re:An idea (1)

ihtoit (3393327) | about 4 months ago | (#47693873)

only if you can develop a mouth lining that's resistant to battery acid, which is what you'll need to decontaminate yourself.

Already started (5, Funny)

LordLucless (582312) | about 4 months ago | (#47692981)

The editors have already begun this process by eating the very name of the fish in question.

Already happened to sharks (1)

Animats (122034) | about 4 months ago | (#47693001)

Before "Jaws", there wasn't much of a market for shark meat. Then demand picked up. Now, the shark population has dropped so much that sharks are facing extinction.

Re:Already happened to sharks (1, Informative)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | about 4 months ago | (#47693413)

Before "Jaws", there wasn't much of a market for shark meat. Then demand picked up. Now, the shark population has dropped so much that sharks are facing extinction.

Isn't it mostly the fins that are taken? The rest is of the shark is mostly worthless and gets dumped in the ocean... free market capitalism at it's finest. It is a pity that most sharks aren't as toxic to humans as the Greenland shark is. Greenland Shark can be eaten but the treatment required to make it edible makes it stink to high heaven.

Re:Already happened to sharks (3, Informative)

Rei (128717) | about 4 months ago | (#47694219)

Yeah, but because it's so weird, all of the tourists who want to be seen as tough have to try it for themselves. ;) I wouldn't be surprised if 75% of hákarl sales are to tourists.

You have to admit, "poisonous urine-scented shark rotted in a pit until it has the texture of cheese, reeks of ammonia and will no longer kill you" isn't the most appetizing food description ;)

Re: Already happened to sharks (2)

AvitarX (172628) | about 4 months ago | (#47694763)

One wonders how they figures that one out initially.

Not even remotely new news (4, Informative)

Rakhar (2731433) | about 4 months ago | (#47693009)

Same species, same proposed solution...back when they first appeared in the US.

Re:Not even remotely new news (5, Informative)

Rakhar (2731433) | about 4 months ago | (#47693015)

http://www.alternet.org/story/... [alternet.org]

2002. This has been brought up over and over. Apparently it isn't working well enough.

Bioaccumulation Ahoy (2, Interesting)

mentil (1748130) | about 4 months ago | (#47693011)

One side-effect of this is that people who eat this fish will consume more mercury, PCBs and other harmful substances compared to if they ate the native (potentially restricted-catch) fish. This is due to the northern snakehead consuming poisons in the water plus toxins accumulated in the flesh of their prey. Humans who eat this fish (or any predatory fish) would thus consume more toxins than if they ate a fish (like much of its prey likely is) that only eats primary producers.

The obvious solution involves Needle Snakes.
Seriously though, how much can we interfere with nature to ensure some animals' survival, and continue to call it 'nature' with a straight face? Eventually, the figurative and literal cage bars make it indistinguishable from captivity. Isn't there a point where we should let evolution do its thing? I know that often leads to extinction, but if we're only keeping wild animals alive so we can eat their tasty flesh, then we may as well keep enough to eat captive.

Bioaccumulation Ahoy (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693209)

You know, the solution for harmfull PCBs, mercury and shit isn't tp eat less fish, but to let less of that crap get in to the waters in the first place. A nation wide "don't poop where you eat" idea. And yes, it will cost some money, your tax money, to enforce the regulations. And yes, it will need some rules on what you can just dump into the rivers and lakes and ocean. And fuck the profits. You can't take the money with you anyways. Leave the damn ball cleaner and better than it was when you were born. That's really the only worthwhile goal mankind has at the moment that we can really do something about. Ihabitating space won't happen for a while, and needs more research. Earth we can save today, if we, as a species, could only get our collective heads out of our asses. Every bit helps. Do your share.

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693357)

Sorry, if you ask people (this of course includes corporations) to act responsibily it will only make it harder for them to survive. What you are proposing is murder. You, sir, are a monster.

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (1)

robsku (1381635) | about 4 months ago | (#47694231)

Word! Large!
   

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (2)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 4 months ago | (#47693297)

One side-effect of this is that people who eat this fish will consume more mercury, PCBs and other harmful substances compared to if they ate the native (potentially restricted-catch) fish.

Citation very much needed.

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (1)

ruir (2709173) | about 4 months ago | (#47693307)

You dont need a citation, you just need common sense, and being able to think about you read. Carnivore fishes/animals have bioaccumulation of toxins of their preys. News at 11.

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (3, Interesting)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 4 months ago | (#47693383)

1) Have you any evidence of any surplus of heavy metals in the abovementioned waters?

2) Have you any evidence that other species of fish from the area have been ruled off limits due to heavy metals contamination?

3) Have you any evidence that this particular species of fish has a record of being a heavy metal accummulator due to its feeding strategies anywhere?

You sound like some boob that read something about tuna one time without actually understanding it. Locally pike fish are the equivalent - I wouldn't eat them but that's because they taste like shit, although they're popular in France so maybe I'm just cooking them wrong. They're perfectly safe to eat.

Re: Bioaccumulation Ahoy (2, Insightful)

MickLinux (579158) | about 4 months ago | (#47693651)

Okay, here's your first citation.

http://www.elizabethriver.org/ [elizabethriver.org]

Now, having worked on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, I can assure you that it is common in the newspapers to have articles about projects to restart clam and oyster aquaculture, which crashed, resulting in a spike in pollution in the water.

But more to the point, I worked at Atlantic Metrocast, where the land had been taken over by the military during world war 2, and all kinds of extremely toxic munitions leaked in. That site is a superfund site, paid for by the Federal Government, because they are the ones who polluted it.
To the south is Julian Creek, where munitions were just dumped into the water, and the cancer rates and birth defect rates are sky-high.

Oh, I haven't mentioned the shipyards yet. They also were dumping in the river, aah, welding materials, lead, whatnot. AND, when the company at the old Bells Mill site needed to turn the mashland of their worksite into solid land, they used fill from the shipyards. So as you walk along the land at BayShore Concrete, you'll every so often find all kinds of heavy-metal-laden industrial parts there, embedded in the ground.

Oh, and don't forget right by the Gilmerton Bridge where there's a recycling center that tears down ships.

Now, that's just the Elizabeth. Let's move on up to the James, where you have Tenneco/Newport News Shipbuilding, the Navy's ship graveyard, and of course Smithfield Hams. And all that agricultural land that gets sprayed every year.

Or how about the Shenandoah River, which five years ago practically died due to heavy metal pollution in the Shenandoah Valley, and dumps into the Chesapeake Bay through Maryland?

Citation needed, I gave you one; I mentioned a few other places where you can find more.

One hint is that wherever you find the military, destruction is not far behind.

Open your eyes and look for yourself, and quit with the laziness, because that's what it is.

Re: Bioaccumulation Ahoy (1)

Muad'Dave (255648) | about 4 months ago | (#47693803)

Let's move on up to the James ...

You forgot the kepone scare of the 70's [wikipedia.org] that shut down the James from Richmond to the Chesapeake for 13 years.

Re: Bioaccumulation Ahoy (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | about 4 months ago | (#47694447)

Open your eyes and look for yourself, and quit with the laziness, because that's what it is.

Asking for evidence is laziness now? You must have a lot of time on your hands.

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (1)

ihtoit (3393327) | about 4 months ago | (#47693951)

http://hal.archives-ouvertes.f... [archives-ouvertes.fr] three SE England estuaries all showing elevated heavy metal concentrations in sediment. Shellfish concentrate HMs for example lead and mercury, fish concentrate mercury in particular. Up the food chain, bioavailability increases. This is why fish farms regularly test for heavy metals and why you won't find any near industrial effluent outlets such as pretty much anywhere South of The Wash or East of Brighton.

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 4 months ago | (#47694661)

2) Have you any evidence that other species of fish from the area have been ruled off limits due to heavy metals contamination?

http://www.mde.state.md.us/programs/Marylander/CitizensInfoCenterHome/Documents/Fish%20Consumption%20Docs/Maryland_Fish_Advisories_2014_Web_bluecatedit.pdf [state.md.us]

Recommended Meals/Month varies from
"Avoid" and "1 every other month" to
"8" and "No Restrictions"

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693385)

You dont need a citation, you just need common sense, and being able to think about you read. Carnivore fishes/animals have bioaccumulation of toxins of their preys. News at 11.

being able to think about you read.

about you read.

You what?

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693913)

You dont need a citation, you just need common sense, and being able to think about you read. Carnivore fishes/animals have bioaccumulation of toxins of their preys. News at 11.

"common sense" is like the anti-citation.

Re:Bioaccumulation Ahoy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693577)

Citation [wikipedia.org]

Bioaccumulation Ahoy (1)

Kanopy (3026223) | about 4 months ago | (#47694055)

If you're worried about too much mercury, just do what our forefathers did: Hang 'em up on a clothes line with their heads down, and when it gets below freezing, cut their heads off.

Sensibility! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693027)

Yay! Sensibility~!

Invasive obsession (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693045)

What is it with the obsession with invasive species? A visit to many US state and national parks includes lectures on how they manage invasive species, to the point where it seem to be the main objective of the park rangers. They seem to be focused on keeping everything the way it was when the Mayflower arrived, as if that was some pinnacle of nature they must strive for. A superior species arrives/evolves, it out eats/breeds the locals; that's just nature, the local species it's killing off did the same thing to other species at some point in the past. Is this an extension of American xenophobia or religious objections to evolution?

Re:Invasive obsession (1)

towermac (752159) | about 4 months ago | (#47693627)

the term you're looking for is 'white guilt'.

Re:Invasive obsession (2)

Joe Gillian (3683399) | about 4 months ago | (#47694217)

In many cases, the invasive species aren't competing to survive because they have no natural predators in the area, and the damage they do can go far beyond merely shoving out local species. Best example of this is the zebra mussel.

Zebra mussels were originally from Russia, but are now on virtually every continent (after steadily invading various locations over the past 300 years) because of their tendency to attach themselves to the sides of ships and their ability to reproduce very quickly. They're a huge problem in a lot of places because they have no natural predators in those areas, and due to the fact that their larvae are microscopic can get into water treatment plants and power plants and clog up machinery. We've got a very good reason for not wanting zebra mussels to spread any more than they already have.

Worst part is, you can't even eat them - they're too small.

The concept has been around before (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693053)

I think there's a book at Amazon called "If You Can't Beat 'Em, Eat 'Em" or something similar. What if an invasive species is inedible or impactically edible? I think California is dealing with clam or mussel infestation right now from a particular species that happens to be very small. To achieve an usable quantity of meat, large amounts of this pest would have to be captured, shelled, etc. on a level that would require automation. I remember reading something on New York dealing with an asian crab infestation. I don't know if the crabs are edible, but they're difficult to catch because they're burrowing throughout the habitat.

What if it is already too late for that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693071)

Just like in Japan's lake Biwa where the imported brass has already eaten up most of the native species?
Then you end up with a lake without fish.
Not to speak about recreational fishers who see they hobby sinking to the bottom of the lake because nothing else bites into everything as these brass.
Should we release some dolphins and whales in this lake for the fishers to hunt down with harpoons and ice picks?
Eating up one kind of fish sounds easier as it it in reality.

What if it is already too late for that? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693101)

Brass, the carnivorous alloy...

In Europe we eat them but... (5, Interesting)

opslashdot (1175689) | about 4 months ago | (#47693079)

In Europe we have been eating this type of invasive specie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wels_catfish) for long but... As its flesh is tasty and as selling these fishes has become quite successfull, we now have farms of such fishes! Of course, these farms compete against fishing in living waters! So, eating invasive species may not be the most successful way of getting rid of them...

Re:In Europe we eat them but... (1)

ruir (2709173) | about 4 months ago | (#47693317)

Catfishes may be cheaper, however we have natural species much more tastier.

Re:In Europe we eat them but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693859)

View the situation from the fish's point of view... ``Yey, we got humans on our side, they'll protect us from the invaders... it's damn lucky that we're tastier than the intruders...amm...wait a minute...aaurgh.''

It's like the cows are an evolutionary success just 'cause they taste great, and don't make trouble while in captivity (a thin wire fence will keep them confined to an area).

Take the what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693435)

"Take the , which has...."

What the fuck is wrong with you editors? Are you seriously this fucking stupid?

Love Invasive Fish (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693489)

I have fished in Florida for 60 years and I flat out love invasive species. They are exciting to catch and easy to catch if one knows how. I was catching snakeheads for several years before reporters first mentioned them. The are very similar to the Bowfins we have always had in Florida and I suspect that they have been in the wild for decades as the fish we thought were bowfins were way to large to actually be bowfins in many vases. We also have oscars as well as many cychlids, peacock bass and rainbow bass as well. So far I haven't seen any silver carp or big head carp but I'm sure they will do well here. We have a mule like Russian carp that was installed to stop certain weeds that get up to about 15 lbs.. And we have the lion fish in salt water in abundance. It adds to the sport of fishing. I say the more species the better. Pythons are common here and we have so many wild hogs that we sort of need the pythons to snag a few. Coyotes also are here as are armadillos which are also invaders. I still like them all.

Here's the problem (2, Funny)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 4 months ago | (#47693643)

The Asian Carp tastes like shit. It's a greasy, nasty-tasting meat with a mushy texture. Maybe if you put enough breading and spices and deep fry it long enough, you might be able to turn it into a mystery meat and pass it off to someone starving.

It sounds like a great idea, but no. Maybe it could be ground up and fed to cats or used as fertilizer. It would be preferable to then bread and deep fry the cat and eat that then to eat an Asian Carp.

And before you tell me that they eat Asian Carp in some god-forsaken hell-hole on the other side in the world, I would also remind you that the same thing could be said about the cat.

Re:Here's the problem (2)

PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) | about 4 months ago | (#47693763)

It's a greasy, nasty-tasting meat with a mushy texture.

McDonald's has made a fortune with that. A McSnakehead might appeal to kids and metal heads, if they included a toy with it.

Re:Here's the problem (1)

operagost (62405) | about 4 months ago | (#47694987)

Snakeheads aren't carp. Snakeheads actually taste good.

Re:Here's the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693769)

Good job sir! I wasn't sure whether to mod you +1 Informative or +1 Funny, and that's never happened before. I went with Informative, but it was a tough call...

Re:Here's the problem (1)

gtall (79522) | about 4 months ago | (#47694183)

I've eaten catfish...it is most tasteless excuse for a fish I've ever eaten. Maybe I ate the wrong kind, but if you have to spice it that much to make it palatable, I'll pass. Maybe if they got them to eat garlic, that would help.

Re:Here's the problem (1)

anjrober (150253) | about 4 months ago | (#47694341)

i believe the previous post was saying they eat Cat, not catfish. the actual cat, like your pet.

catfish can be prepared very nicely. its eaten all over the midwest and south. perfectly tasty fish.

i eat about anything, but even i have to skip the actual cat. garfield can't be tasty.

Re:Here's the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47694391)

The real problem with eating Asian carp isn't their taste, it is that they're incredibly bony, so you're never going to get a filet out of one.

Re:Here's the problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47694675)

"I would also remind you that the same thing could be said about the cat."

what can be said, that you tasted it and it is not good?

here is a thought, if you dont like it just dont eat it. If others do, sell it to them. Not sure you are the definitive authority of what can and cant be eaten.

Not a new or unique solution (2)

Trailer Trash (60756) | about 4 months ago | (#47693669)

Glenn Reynolds at Instapundit has been suggesting this approach for years with this and other invasive species. Ultimately it's the only way to go. When you say the fish "has no natural predators" - well, I know a *bunch* of potential predators....

Eating Invasive species? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693733)

but I dont want to eat Americans, they will be high in fat and taste horrible due to all the steroids and hormones they ingest in their meat and the beer that tastes like piss they drink.

Cat Food! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47693737)

Or dog food, or other animal feed. Creating a commercial demand that doesn't depend on sometimes fussy human palates seems like a sure way to push an invasive species to the brink of local extinction.

Here, fishy fishy!

Re:Cat Food! (1)

ihtoit (3393327) | about 4 months ago | (#47694007)

dunno about your cats but mine won't touch Mekong cobbler (a type of catfish the Vietnamese farm in massive numbers and sell at a rate which no other nation would find economically viable). Personally, I don't see anything wrong with it, you just have to not overpower it with flavour. Just a dash of cracked pepper, sprig or two of dill, lightly grill, jobbed.

Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day... (1)

mowaterfowl (2859817) | about 4 months ago | (#47693887)

We should offer tax incentives to commercial fisherman who harvest them in mass for soup kitchens.

Almost there (5, Funny)

nospam007 (722110) | about 4 months ago | (#47693927)

Now all we need is some invasive species of chips.

Been saying this for years (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47694221)

Being at the top of the food chain, the solution to these sorts of "invasive species" problems has always seemed self-evident to me.

White Perch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47694407)

We have a similar problem in Michigan with the White Perch. It's not exactly an invasive species, but it is a nuisance. Basically we have zero limits on fishing those bad boys out of the waters, and now it's one of the cheapest fresh fish in our state, very common at our Farmers Markets. Very tasty too, pan fries up real nice.

What the fuck? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47694867)

What the fuck is this even supposed to mean?

"Take the , which has made its way into tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. It competes with native"

You god damn stupid incompetent dumb fucks.

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