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Why The Korean Government Could Go Open Source By 2020

timothy posted about 3 months ago | from the file-formats-matter dept.

Open Source 64

An anonymous reader writes As the support for the Microsoft (MS) Windows XP service is terminated this year, the government will try to invigorate open source software in order to solve the problem of dependency on certain software. By 2020 when the support of the Windows 7 service is terminated, it is planning to switch to open OS and minimize damages. Industry insiders pointed out that the standard e-document format must be established and shared as an open source before open source software is invigorated. A similar suggestion that Korea might embrace more open source (but couched more cautiously, with more "should" and "may") is reported on the news page of the EU's program on Interoperability Solutions for European Public Administrations, based on a workshop presentation earlier this month by Korea's Ministry of Science, ICT, and Future Planning. (And at a smaller but still huge scale, the capitol city of Seoul appears to be going in for open source software in a big way, too.)

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Yes. (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339173)

Here comes the year of the Linux desktop.

Re:Yes. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339231)

No, I'm pretty sure that Apple will continue to swallow up 95% of the money and market-share generated from the ongoing stream of Open Source code they didn't create, and toss some "contributions" back to the "community" to keep them providing Apple with OS-es and the like for free.

(Thanks, suckers!)

Re:Yes. (3, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 months ago | (#47339245)

No, I'm pretty sure that Apple will continue to swallow up 95% of the money and market-share generated from the ongoing stream of Open Source

Apple will never be considered for this kind of program as long as they have a weak commitment to backwards compatibility. That's essentially why Korea is leaving Microsoft here (and Microsoft has a lot of backwards compatibility, you just have to pay for it).

Re:Yes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339263)

ReactOS is open source, 2020 could be the year of the free open source Windows clone that finally works.

Re: Yes. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339309)

You don't need to wait until 2020. There are plenty of good Linux distros available. If you want an experience as close to Windows, there is Mint cinnamon 16.

Re: Yes. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339333)

"Written completely from scratch, ReactOS [reactos.org] is not a Linux based system, and shares none of the UNIX architecture. The main goal of the ReactOS® project is to provide an operating system which is binary compatible with Windows. This will allow your Windows® applications and drivers to run as they would on your Windows system."

Google I/O (5, Insightful)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 3 months ago | (#47339299)

Here comes the year of the Linux desktop.

The Linux Desktop is already here. In and amongst the pissing contest in early markets consoles; watches, home, health between Apple and Google (What happened to Microsoft). Chrome OS got Android compatibility and Office Update and its Office improved, massive Android integration, and Google Play . As well as some great adoption statistics. 8 OEMs making 15 distinct Chrome OS devices now on sale in 28 countries, 10 highest rated notebooks available on Amazon.com and Chromebooks sold to K-12 schools has risen 6x.

The fact that GNU Linux continues to flourish is just an aside.

Re:Google I/O (5, Informative)

jones_supa (887896) | about 3 months ago | (#47339505)

On PC desktop the QA is still terrible. For example, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS ships with a media player which does not work properly with touchpad [launchpad.net] and which crashes when the subtitle setting is changed [launchpad.net] . Also the ACPI fan speed control is broken [launchpad.net] for a bunch of laptops. Sure, the correct solution here is simply to switch from Totem to VLC, and use a different kernel for the fan problem. Easy enough... but soon enough, some other glitch pops up. As long as Linux desktops (not only Ubuntu) are filled with these nasty surprises, the support costs will be enormous for fixing all these bugs or finding workarounds for them.

Re:Google I/O (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 3 months ago | (#47339849)

On PC desktop the QA is still terrible. For example,

Windows 8 accepts your challenge for terrible. Integral mail program doesn't do POP mail, Can't make desktop shortcuts fo rall programs, Updates borking other programs, force updates that reset preferences. And that interface from hell that forces you to do everything differently than every other OS has done for years, Approaching Unuseable when you're not on a touchscreen

Your move.

Re:Google I/O (2)

jones_supa (887896) | about 3 months ago | (#47339889)

There is also a bug where the initial install of Windows 8 fails to show progress when installing updates (stuck at 0%), while the backend updates worker is actually installing updates just fine. Also a bug from Windows 7 is still present: the File Explorer occasionally loses the ability to display Japanese characters properly: they are shown as squares instead. The "Burn disc" button does not work from the ribbon menu, but "Burn disc" from the right-click context menu works.

Hey, I agree with you. Windows is not an angel either.

The problem is that Linux has 100x more of these kind of bugs.

Re:Google I/O (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47340021)

What integral mail program? As far as I know, Windows 8 doesn't come with an email client, nor is it essential anymore. Webmail is ubiquitous these days. If you need POP mail access, download one of dozens of free email clients. I can't confirm your problem with making program shortcuts on the desktop. Are you talking about Metro apps? Besides, only idiots put program shortcuts on the desktop. Also haven't had any problems with settings getting reset under any conditions. The interface was no problem for me. Started with the TI 99/4a, onto the Amiga, then Windows 95 and up. I really like the Start Screen. Most software installs default to a single icon for most installs and it's a breeze to arrange. If you can't figure it out or adapt, it's your own problem.

Re:Google I/O (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 3 months ago | (#47351291)

What integral mail program? As far as I know, Windows 8 doesn't come with an email client, nor is it essential anymore.

Yes, it has one.

Webmail is ubiquitous these days.

That does not make it any good.

If you need POP mail access, download one of dozens of free email clients.

That isn't the point. The point is if you have an integral mail program, you should make at least some attempt to accommodate people. Los of people still have POPmail. And the suggestions are ludicrous, from changing ISP's to opening a gmail account, then forwarding all your POPMail to that, then using the integral program to that account, and reading it in the Windows mail reader.

And yes, I've had to install T-Bird or the like.

I can't confirm your problem with making program shortcuts on the desktop. Are you talking about Metro apps? Besides, only idiots put program shortcuts on the desktop.

I was waiting for that one. Yes, make sure that you call anyone who doesn't like something about Windows an idiot. A long proud tradition that started with Windows Vista not having drivers for contemporary equipment. Stupid idiots should have developed ESP or something.

With all due respect, fanboi, What do you do for customers that want their applications shortcutted on the desktop? Call them idiots, and bask in the glow of knowing your superiority over stupid people? You and Microsoft's problem is that you think that anyone who doesn't do things your way is an idiot. Hate to break it to you, but there are people smarter than you, and people who are smarter than me, who want applicataion shortcuts on their desktops.

Also haven't had any problems with settings getting reset under any conditions.

I've seen forced updates, I've seen security settings changed from not updating to auto updates, I'veseen applications settings changed, and the time honored tradition of updates resetting program preferences or just causing the application to fail.

The interface was no problem for me.

It depends on the definition of "problem". It's obvious that you touch the screen, and the program opens. Or do some gyrations with a non touch screen to do the same. Yeah it works, but it's a stupid phone os grafted onto a laptop/desktop environment. And I do have a philosophical problem with that. And you don't even need a phone OS to deal with a touchscreen. When my better half decided that she had enough of Windows 8, I installed Llinux Mint on her touch screen laptop, and it works just fine. And she doesn't have any of the problems she did when it was running W8 or 8.1.

If you can't figure it out or adapt, it's your own problem.

More the assumptions that I can't figure it out. Knowing something is stupid or clumsy is not an inability to figure it out. I worked with Windows 8 for a year before I decided it didn't fit with my idea of what personal computing should be. And I adapted by abandoning it, which has turned out to be a very good and productive move.

Re:Google I/O (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 3 months ago | (#47349513)

If I might. The ultimate Windows fanboi rated my comment overrated, when I pointed out several distinct and very true flaws in Windows 8.

Look fanboi, why not use your massive knowledge of all that is true and good to refute what I wrote. Oh..... wait....... you can't.

Re:Google I/O (1)

lsatenstein (949458) | about 3 months ago | (#47345539)

On PC desktop the QA is still terrible. For example, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS ships with a media player which does not work properly with touchpad [launchpad.net] and which crashes when the subtitle setting is changed [launchpad.net] . Also the ACPI fan speed control is broken [launchpad.net] for a bunch of laptops. Sure, the correct solution here is simply to switch from Totem to VLC, and use a different kernel for the fan problem. Easy enough... but soon enough, some other glitch pops up. As long as Linux desktops (not only Ubuntu) are filled with these nasty surprises, the support costs will be enormous for fixing all these bugs or finding workarounds for them.

Who uses Ubuntu. I use
http://mirror.yandex.ru/fedora... [yandex.ru]

Everything works, has a great following too.

Re:Google I/O (1)

Blaskowicz (634489) | about 3 months ago | (#47339655)

So the solution is to use the kernel and throw out everything than ran on top?

Why not.. I'd rather use Windows than get a google account, though.

Chrome browser == Linux desktop (2)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | about 3 months ago | (#47341469)

In the heydays, immediately after the IPO, when Netscape stock price was zooming up, Marc Andreesen boasted, "The desktop is irrelevant. OS is irrelevant. The Browser is the new king of the hill" (not an exact quote). Microsoft took the threat seriously, fought hard, fought dirty, and killed Netscape as a company. But it could not kill the idea. It won the battle with Netscape but lost the war with the browser.

Once someone with serious financial muscle, namely Google, took up the idea, it was game over for the desktop. Google docs has much smaller set of features compared to Microsoft Office. But it is enough to meet 100% of the needs of 90% of the population. It is also enough to meet 90% of the needs of the remaining 10%. Mere 10% of the user base using these bells and whistles for just 10% of the time. ChromeOS is based on a Linux kernel. Android pads and phones are based on Linux. Linux has taken over the server market. It has been the decade of Linux.

In a meta sense, the old PC desktop market was based on selling everyone the superset of needs of all the users. Grandma wanting a machine to look at pics of grandkids was buying a machine capable of developing C++ projects or doing video editing. Once Apple broke the market into two pieces, content creators and content consumers it was a true paradigm shift. But even grandma needs to type a letter once in a while. The browser is enough to meet that need,

Similar shift will happen in automobiles. Everyone is buying a machine that can refuel/recharge in 10 minutes to go another 250 miles. Even the second and the third car of the family is bought with the same mind set. But it can change very quickly. Solar is picking up. It is cost effective for people to ditch the grid. Utilities are looking for a way to keep them in the grid. Grabbing a piece of the transportation energy market would be very attractive to them. When Big Oil gets a real well financed competitor well versed in dirty local politics, the electric utilities, that is when electric cars will take off.

There are many technologies maturing. Basic range of 100 miles is well within reach. Range extending options based on rentable charged batteries, battery swaps, towable range extending battery packs, range extending IC engines are all possible. The challenge is not the technology, but the investment needed for infrastructure.

Probably not (1)

tsa (15680) | about 3 months ago | (#47339187)

2020 is a long way away. Politicians usually only have long term vision when they don't want to make decisions about something. So MS will most probably still be strong in Korea by 2020.

You Go Girl (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 3 months ago | (#47339305)

2020 is a long way away. Politicians usually only have long term vision when they don't want to make decisions about something. So MS will most probably still be strong in Korea by 2020.

You are so right, governments woldwide are famous for making quick and timely visions, especially when it involves changing major infrastructure.

Re:You Go Girl (1)

tsa (15680) | about 3 months ago | (#47339373)

Here in the Netherlands we do that all the time. It costs us billions of euros in useless infrastructure and failed ICT projects. Especially with big ICT projects our government has a failure rate of nearly 100%.

Re:Probably not (1)

rtb61 (674572) | about 3 months ago | (#47339555)

No bloody way, Samsung, LG and Android say so. Android has been the spear to finally kill the beast of Redmond dominance of the desktop. Many tech companies in Korea will not want the government to subsidise M$ at their triple expense ie paying for it to happen in training at schools and then paying again to retrain those students and paying yet again with regard to all of their interactions with government.

LG and Samsung are both big on Linux which of course underlies Android and they will want to extend that growth well beyond smart phones and smart TVs.

Re:Probably not (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47340879)

Starcraft runs only on Windows. So Korea is pretty much locked into Windows.

e-document format? ODF? (2)

Lonewolf666 (259450) | about 3 months ago | (#47339189)

For the most common purposes, like text documents and spreadsheets there is already ODF.
It is even an ISO standard. Unless there are unexpected problems with things like Asian fonts, that should be a no-brainer.

Not a chance (4, Interesting)

Corrin Lakeland (3559519) | about 3 months ago | (#47339199)

Korea is very tightly wed to Microsoft. I've seen linux on some servers and of course embedded devices, but I have never seen it on the desktop there. A huge amount of the software is Windows only, with both Mac and Linux users completely locked out. It's a pretty conservative, conformist culture - especially at a government level.

Re:Not a chance (0, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339257)

At least you don't have all the citizens shit-scared that if their WiFi is open to the public that the police will descend on them and throw them in jail for the rest of their lives. It's easy to get a WiFi connection in Seoul without giving your personal information away.

Reviewing the recent Slashdot story on routers that share a bit of bandwidth with the public reveal that, in some ways, South Korea is a liberal utopia of internet freedom compared to the likes of the US.

Re:Not a chance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339383)

I don't think so... "Why South Korea is really an internet dinosaur" http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2014/02/economist-explains-3

Censorship, online gaming banned during the night, have to log-in with a government-provided ID, real-name policy on public forums...

Re:Not a chance (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 3 months ago | (#47339857)

Korea is very tightly wed to Microsoft. I've seen linux on some servers and of course embedded devices, but I have never seen it on the desktop there. A huge amount of the software is Windows only, with both Mac and Linux users completely locked out. It's a pretty conservative, conformist culture - especially at a government level.

So you figure that conservatives like that yummy Metro interface along with all the other mutant W8 features?

Re:Not a chance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47340215)

So you figure that conservatives like that yummy Metro interface along with all the other mutant W8 features?

Much easier for conservatives to adapt to Windows 8 having used previous versions. Few could tolerate the switch to a GNU/Linux desktop, which in almost all flavors resembles an aborted fetus with Down's syndrome.

Re:Not a chance (1)

Ol Olsoc (1175323) | about 3 months ago | (#47351339)

So you figure that conservatives like that yummy Metro interface along with all the other mutant W8 features?

Much easier for conservatives to adapt to Windows 8 having used previous versions. Few could tolerate the switch to a GNU/Linux desktop, which in almost all flavors resembles an aborted fetus with Down's syndrome.

Funny, My better half instantly adapted to linux mint touchscreen after we took W8 off of it. Your incredibly stupid fetus argument tell me you know nothing about Linux.

Re:Not a chance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47342367)

It tells you something about the status of Linux on the desktop when Windows 8 is better than it.

Re:Not a chance (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47343347)

All it tells me is that no matter how annoyed people get with Microsoft/Windows, they'd rather stick with that they know, and more importantly, what everyone else uses. Windows 8 is different yes but so long as you work out how to clock on the Desktop tile the actual desktop interface is extremely similar to previous versions of Windows, including the ability to run all the software people have built up a library of. Changing operating systems is more trouble than it's worth for most people. Easier to just adapt to what's changed as opposed to relearn something entirely new.

"The" Korean government? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339203)

Last I checked there were at least two Korean governments.

Re:"The" Korean government? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339219)

Last I checked, you are a dildo.

You can safely assume that when an article is talking about Korean non-military technology, and in particular, software licensing, you can be sure it's about the southern version. The northern version is barely electrified, let alone worried about royalties for software.

Unless you are a dildo, of course.

You're probably one of those knob goblins who lisps whenever they can, "America is a continent, not a country."

Re:"The" Korean government? (4, Funny)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 months ago | (#47339225)

Last I checked there were at least two Korean governments.

It's South Korea. The Dear Leader invented Open Source, so South Korea is behind the times in adopting.

Re: "The" Korean government? (2, Interesting)

binarylarry (1338699) | about 3 months ago | (#47339531)

NK doesn't have a govt, it's a communist utopia ruled by a god king.

Re: "The" Korean government? (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about 3 months ago | (#47339743)

I thought he was dead.

Didn't Seth Rogen shoot him?

Re: "The" Korean government? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339805)

No, Seth Rogen inspires others to go shooting because he always gets the girl.

Re: "The" Korean government? (1)

gtall (79522) | about 3 months ago | (#47340515)

The Dear Shrimp has ordered me to inform you that you will be killed with a thousand deaths for asking such a malicious and war-mongering statement. Several missiles will be sent to annoy the fish very, very soon. You've been warned!!!

Re: "The" Korean government? (1)

gtall (79522) | about 3 months ago | (#47340507)

Looks more like a Twinkie King to me.

Re: "The" Korean government? (1)

dublin (31215) | about 3 months ago | (#47361839)

And this distinguishes it from the US how?

Re:"The" Korean government? (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about 3 months ago | (#47339777)

2 Chinas, 2 Congos and a Macedonia that the Greek government refuses to endorse.

You're going to be seeing this a lot more (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339241)

Now that XP is done for we have a horde of insecure PCs that need updates. They cannot be upgraded to a later version of Windows because their hardware is as old as XP is. Conditions are ripe for a switch to Linux.

Very difficult to do (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339279)

Korea (presumably South Korea) is infatuated with Microsoft tech. ActiveX is used everywhere - banks, online shopping, even gateways for various official and private services. Despite the technological marvel that South Korea is at times, Active X & Internet Explorer are the apex of their Internet communications and Linux is basically not used anywhere. For open source to work, there will have to be a complete shakeup of how everyone uses computers and the Internet over there, including non-Government business and regular users. That'll take some time.

Active X? (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 3 months ago | (#47339331)

Korea (presumably South Korea) is infatuated with Microsoft tech. ActiveX is used everywhere

2020...in Five years they can easily do replace everything...with sanctions and tax breaks even sooner.

Also illegal, so far... (5, Informative)

tlambert (566799) | about 3 months ago | (#47339345)

Also illegal, so far... It's illegal to use something other than the ActiveX plugin authorized by the Korean government to do online banking in South Korea. The current president promised to change things, but so far, nothing has changed. Here's his promise being reported:

http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/So... [wikinews.org]

The problem is that Korea requires use of their own national encryption standard, which has a governmental back door (and for which exploits have already been demonstrated at BlackHat) in order to "secure" banking transactions from snooping by foreign powers (guess they called that one correctly).

Here are some other articles about where the plugin is required to establish secure communications channels:

http://gadgets.ndtv.com/intern... [ndtv.com]
http://www.washingtonpost.com/... [washingtonpost.com]
https://www.techdirt.com/artic... [techdirt.com]

SEED "backdoor"? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339779)

The problem is that Korea requires use of their own national encryption standard, which has a governmental back door (and for which exploits have already been demonstrated at BlackHat) in order to "secure" banking transactions from snooping by foreign powers (guess they called that one correctly).

[citation needed]

Can you provide a link to the paper/presentation in which the exploit and/or backdoor has been shown?

A quick search doesn't turn anything up, but "seed" is a bit of a generic term (and is also used in reference to RNG in crypto) and so there's a lot of noise.

Re:SEED "backdoor"? (1)

tlambert (566799) | about 3 months ago | (#47343791)

The problem is that Korea requires use of their own national encryption standard, which has a governmental back door (and for which exploits have already been demonstrated at BlackHat) in order to "secure" banking transactions from snooping by foreign powers (guess they called that one correctly).

[citation needed]

Can you provide a link to the paper/presentation in which the exploit and/or backdoor has been shown?

A quick search doesn't turn anything up, but "seed" is a bit of a generic term (and is also used in reference to RNG in crypto) and so there's a lot of noise.

http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm... [acm.org] (search for "SEED encryption", with the quotation marks to get similar results).

Here's another algorithm indicating identity exposure (SEED's keying system is specifically designed to *always* expose identity, which means that a lot of sites aren't very secure, since they can know who the culprit was, they don't figure they need to secure them):

http://privacy-pc.com/articles... [privacy-pc.com]

I'm pretty sure the demo was by Chae Jong Bin, if that helps.

Re:Also illegal, so far... (2)

sensei moreh (868829) | about 3 months ago | (#47340149)

I do believe the current president is a her

Re:Also illegal, so far... (1)

gtall (79522) | about 3 months ago | (#47340523)

Yep, Park Geun-hye. I'll bet she can arm-wrestle the Dear Dumpling from N. Korea to a win.

Re:Very difficult to do (1)

Tough Love (215404) | about 3 months ago | (#47346099)

Despite the technological marvel that South Korea is at times, Active X & Internet Explorer are the apex of their Internet communications and Linux is basically not used anywhere.

Android phones are a major exception. Microsoft has negligible presence in Korea on handsets. Other exceptions are the usual ones: data centers, routers, tvs, etc etc.

Yeah right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339355)

All these companies and 'governments' thinking they got screwed over by microsoft because the dropped XP support are dreaming. If they think they will mitigate their exposure to having the support dropped on them by using open source they can think again. Linux/Open Source OS's all have shorted life cycles and have plenty of problems which far outweigh the exploits that the microsoft platform has. What will happen, and ive seen it already, is they will make a major investment into open source, have no end of problems as the costs associated with changing the way they do things will far out weigh living within the long life cycle of a closed source OS backed by a company that does indeed get behind their software. The collective voice of the end users will force them back to an OS that will just work.

Im not anti-linux, I use linux as much as I use windows, but linux is still not ready for the desktop, but its close and IMO opensuse has the best chance on making a successful platform alternative.

RoK? Or PRoK? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339387)

Am I seriously the only one annoyed that people say "Korea" (the peninsula) when they mean "the Republic of Korea" (South Korea), or rarely, "the People's Republic of Korea" (North Korea)? When I hear people mention they enjoyed their trip to Korea, I ask how they liked Pyongyang.

Re:RoK? Or PRoK? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339463)

Am I seriously the only one annoyed that people say "Korea" (the peninsula) when they mean "the Republic of Korea" (South Korea), or rarely, "the People's Republic of Korea" (North Korea)?

Yes.

Re:RoK? Or PRoK? (2)

nukenerd (172703) | about 3 months ago | (#47339975)

No.

I followed the first link in TFA ("Korea IT News") to find out, and even that did not tell me. Then I noticed a reference to "the capital city of Seoul" in the last line, but it was not clear that it did not relate to a different story. Even assuming Seoul was the capital concerned, I confess that I could not remember whether it was North or the South (not being American, I am not as close to the subject) so I went to Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] and, incredibly, even that does not tell you.

Re:RoK? Or PRoK? (1)

trytoguess (875793) | about 3 months ago | (#47342895)

It's always the RoK when people just say Korea. If a news organization is talking about North Korea they will specifically spell out that NORTH Korea did XYZ. It's analogous to having two Bobs in one house. One's an average dude, while the other locks himself in his room, stepping out every once in awhile to brag about how awesome his 2" penis is. In everyday conversions, they'll be Bob and crazy Bob.

The role of Tizen in the republic of samsung ? (1)

rzr (898397) | about 3 months ago | (#47339415)

Is Tizen the "OS of everything" part of the plan ... this would make sense Anyway there are several flavour of opensource and I am wondering what OSS could mean over there ... See you again in 2020 ...

Open Drivers (2)

FithisUX (855293) | about 3 months ago | (#47339423)

Open Source will thrive when documents mandate that every device must be accompanied by a document describing how this will be programmed. In other way you buy an NVIDIA card or an smart phone and you get a PDF that gives detailed specification of how software can use the device (not how it is manufactured) to get the advertised functionality. this should extended to all sub-components that interact with the software. Using undocumented functionality should be illegal since it is a means to provide illegal competitive advantage. No blobs.

Re:Open Drivers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47340001)

You would still need the big team of paid engineers to make a good full-feature and optimized driver. This kind of group can probably only be found inside NVIDIA, a loosely-knit group of hackers around the world working during weekends won't cut it.

Re:Open Drivers (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47340873)

yes but i could still roll my own or use contributions from academia. But even if NVIDIA releases a blob any third party can sell another blob which could be better.

ReactOS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47339773)

The death of WinXP support should be a huge boon to the ReactOS project. It's an open source Windows clone. It's not a layer on top of the Linux kernel designed to run just applications. It's a (soon to be) full implementation of the NT kernel (which is a terrific kernel, IMHO) on up. Like it or hate it -- this means that every layer of the Microsoft stack is there providing compatibility with drivers, ActiveX crapola (eventually), and all the other tons of Windows specific software that, like it or not, people use on a daily basis.

While the upper layers of Windows have a somewhat questionable design the kernel layer and base are quite well designed thanks to David Cutler. If you're looking for a great open source project to invest some time in try ReactOS [reactos.org] .

Re:ReactOS (1)

nukenerd (172703) | about 3 months ago | (#47340049)

The death of WinXP support should be a huge boon to the ReactOS project. .

Looks like it needs a huge boon, being still only in alpha. I don't think the South Korean Government will be going that way, nor many others. I would put ReactOS in a similar category to the projects to maintain OS/2 (eg eComStation) and DOS (eg FreeDOS), very small niches.

That's interesting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47340033)

... considering you can do nothing on a computer in South Korea now without Windows. Not interact with banks or the government at least.
They're negotiating a huge discount for Windows 8 perhaps? :)

Re:That's interesting... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47340135)

They're negotiating a huge discount for Windows 8 perhaps? :)

That is how these situations have traditionally been resolved. A government or a big company cringes the big price of Windows upgrade, maybe mentions Linux. After a couple of days, receives a special discount from Microsoft, and world goes on just like yesterday.

Actually would be interesting to know what is going on inside Microsoft's marketing department right now. They must be working real hard how to get China back on the upgrade wagon, for example. After all, even Billy G has said that even the worst case scenario of running a pirated copy is still better than using a competitor's product.

hum (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47340593)

MS has their programmers and then their designers. The linux world is missing designers. Linux needs an intuitive and stable DE. All DE's that I have tried are buggy and feels like I'm running windows 98.

Which Korea? (2)

bradgoodman (964302) | about 3 months ago | (#47341153)

Kool Korea, or Krazy Korea?
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