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How FBI Informant Sabu Helped Anonymous Hack Brazil

samzenpus posted about 3 months ago | from the working-for-the-man dept.

United States 59

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes 'A year after leaked files exposed the National Security Agency's efforts to spy on citizens and companies in Brazil, previously unpublished chat logs obtained by Motherboard reveal that while under the FBI's supervision, Hector Xavier Monsegur, widely known by his online persona, "Sabu," facilitated attacks that affected Brazilian websites.The operation raises questions about how the FBI uses global Internet vulnerabilities during cybercrime investigations, how it works with informants, and how it shares information with other police and intelligence agencies.

After his arrest in mid-2011, Monsegur continued to organize cyber attacks while working for the FBI. According to documents and interviews, Monsegur passed targets and exploits to hackers to disrupt government and corporate servers in Brazil and several other countries. Details about his work as a federal informant have been kept mostly secret, aired only in closed-door hearings and in redacted documents that include chat logs between Monsegur and other hackers. The chat logs remain under seal due to a protective order upheld in court, but in April, they and other court documents were obtained by journalists at Motherboard and the Daily Dot.'

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Snitch (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176139)

Someday someone will get him back just for the lulz

Re:Snitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176521)

The no-snitch mentality for worthless poor trash. That kind of talk doesn't belong here. I'm sure there's a hip-hop forum or cannabis forum where you could meet your peers who would love to talk about how snitches should be punished and how crime should be celebrated.

Re:Snitch (0)

koreanbabykilla (305807) | about 3 months ago | (#47176579)

DIAF douchbag. cops make you rat out your friends to not serve unjustified crazy time. If no one talks, everyone walks. They crack one weak person and everyone goes down. Hence, it has evoled that if ya wanna play the game, keep your fucking mouth shut or you might die.

Re:Snitch (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176629)

Internet criminals almost always rat, because these people aren't really friends. Just text in an IRC channel.

Re:Snitch (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about 2 months ago | (#47178413)

Depends on why the snitch is snitching. When a snitch snitches because he got in over his head and crime got real, thats one thing. When a robber whose accomplice murders someone "snitches", well thats hardly the most common case anyway.

However, this is something else. This is a guy who got caught snitching on his crew and even helping to trap them, not because he was morally outraged, but only to save his own hide. I have no respect for that sort of thing. He did what he did and he got caught... turning on his former comrads? Ruin them and theirs to save him and his? There is nothing defensible about that.

Re:Snitch (1)

Greeninja (1936704) | about 2 months ago | (#47178599)

Sabu got caught early on in the game, and they used his kids as a way to get him to inform. They threatened that he would never see them again. Either way it is still messed up because most of the time they have to do things like that they have very little on you anyways. It's always better to say nothing.

Re:Snitch (1)

TheCarp (96830) | about 2 months ago | (#47186133)

There was a guy in NH who was arrested for selling a pound of pot. The informant who was used to trap him? A heroin dealer. They wanted to throw the book at him over it too because he refused to be their informant inside a peaceful activist group.

Send a heroin dealer to catch a pot dealer...amazing.

So Anonymous were useful idiots for the FBI? (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176153)

Using Anonymous as a by-proxy hacking tool. Brilliant! I'm surprised the NSA hasn't...

oh crap

Re: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176181)

Stupid enough to work for the government... end of story.

Re:So Anonymous were useful idiots for the FBI? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176197)

Them and their stupid fucking masks. They think they're so clever but they play right into the hands of big brother. Just another tool of the man.

Re:So Anonymous were useful idiots for the FBI? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176981)

And what, if anything, have you done to either bring attention to or fight the oppression of "the man?" Bitch and moan on a tech blog?

Re:So Anonymous were useful idiots for the FBI? (1)

Number42 (3443229) | about 3 months ago | (#47177435)

Wait. Isn't that what fighting the man is?

Re:So Anonymous were useful idiots for the FBI? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47178699)

what has Anonymous done to fight the man? attack sony for breaking their PS3? meanwhile, they are a tool of NSA. suckers.

anunimus iz leejun XD - (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176237)

So, it's finally come full circle. Those mask-wearing tools are now pawns of the very same police state they frequently claim to oppose.

Brainless idiots.

Re: anunimus iz leejun XD - (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176265)

What's the alternative? Life in prison? I'm sure the govy will go out of their way to make their stay comfortable.

Re:anunimus iz leejun XD - (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47179249)

"Anonymous is one group" - you, 2014.

Anonymous is a collective name for hundreds of cells of people, from really actually good hackers to useless pawns (the retards everyone knows about) that make up most of their numbers.

That's how they did it! (4, Interesting)

dave562 (969951) | about 3 months ago | (#47176275)

Recently there was an article about how the FBI was having problems recruiting competent IT talent due to their zero tolerance policy with marijuana.

Apparently that problem has been solved. All they really need to do is arrest the people who have the skills that they need, and then coerce them into doing the work that needs to be done.

We all know that the prison system is often tapped as a source of unskilled and low skilled labor. Obviously this is just taking that model to a new level. What's next? Mass incarceration of bitTorrent users who will then be forced into the life of skript kiddies in exchange for money on the books at the Club Fed commissary?

Re:That's how they did it! (2)

AHuxley (892839) | about 3 months ago | (#47176463)

Re All they really need to do is arrest the people who have the skills that they need, and then coerce them into doing the work that needs to be done.
That method of enter and turn into gov informants worked well for the labor movement, woman rights, law reform, peace activists, anti nuclear protesters, animal rights, tax reform, far left, far right, 3rd party, faith based groups.
The methods are usually the same - join the gov backed NGO and do useless busy work, tax free with a nice wage, car and hand out/sell glossy safe material to people while asking for support.
Start a group and find your 5th or 8th supporter an informant or gov official reporting on you. With federal funding they can become part of the group for years, decades, working their way up, even taking over the group. At a state, city, local level, funding might be tight and they have to induce action that can be used in court at a much more rapid rate.
Mass incarceration was considered by East Germany - the costs of keeping the vast numbers in clothing, feeding them, guarding the location, ensuring the relatives understood the nature of the arrest - it all becomes very expensive and complex. Better just to flood any movement with informants from younger to retired and see what they bring back using charm, skills or the life experience to fit in.
The contact can be positive - first name, an offer to chat, a coffee, no more loans, no tax, spending money, that car, holiday for doing what interests you. Just making notes, recording, getting up to admin level pw, suggesting the next 'protest'... bringing a new face in.
The contact can be negative - you have to work fast or you get the concurrent and consecutive criminal sentences.

Re:That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47177149)

That method of enter and turn into gov informants worked well for the labor movement, woman rights, law reform, peace activists, anti nuclear protesters, animal rights, tax reform, far left, far right, 3rd party, faith based groups.

The FBI had NSA style programs to target and track those groups, and public relations programs to use the press/media to discredit and even create taboos/myths to get the general public NOT to support those groups. The US has abused it governmental powers just like Russia to try and quash any uprisings that were using protests, they used military style tactics during the Civil Rights movement, most if not all of them were peaceful, but the US used propaganda by having news cameras present during their police raids on protestors claiming they were violent communist sympathizers looking to destroy America.

There's no doubt they also used informants as well to gather information on these movements, but those movements already had well established leaders that were trusted and were in those positions to stay, Because even those movements had their own government informants at certain positions telling them about the FBI and other agencies desires to infiltrate their movements, so they were fully aware of the governments plans to use agents/informants You underestimate how informed these movements were about government programs designed to destroy them, which is why those movements went on to become successful.

The labor movement won out because of the 'New Deal" -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Deal

Re:That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176503)

They solved the problem by lowering their standards and just hiring drug addicts outright. Rather than help these people get clean, they figured they'd turn a blind eye to their drug use as long as they were productive and useful -- regardless of the long-term risks of marijuana use. Their work as hackers was more important than their health or mental stability.

So in both cases they are just using up talent, either through threat of arrest, or through permitting them to be functional drug addicts. It's one way to burn the candle at both ends.

Re:That's how they did it! (2)

fnj (64210) | about 3 months ago | (#47176529)

They solved the problem by lowering their standards and just hiring drug addicts outright.

It is spectacularly ignorant to refer to marijuana users as "drug addicts".

Re:That's how they did it! (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176657)

It's spectacularly ignorant to ignore the fact that marijuana is addictive, and this has been established for a number of years now. Here's an excerpt from a peer-reviewed journal making this point:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2797098/

"Although some people question the concept of marijuana dependence or addiction, diagnostic, epidemiological, laboratory, and clinical studies clearly indicate that the condition exists, is important, and causes harm"

There exists a great body of articles that have scientifically proven the harm marijuana does. Correspondingly there are no scientific articles that conclusively invalidate any of these findings, and there are a small body of articles that have found legitimate uses for marijuana in an extraordinarily limited scope, findings which in _no way_ support recreational use outside of individuals with very specific medical conditions.

I encourage you to educate yourself. You should look into the effects marijuana has on psychosis, schizophrenia, worsening depression, paranoia, impacting motivation, and altering the density of grey matter in the brain. If you are a Reddit user, please read /r/leaves and look at how real people desperately struggle to quit using marijuana, with effects persisting for months or years.

I always invite people who support marijuana use to educate themselves, because misinformation is the cornerstone of the drug legalization policy. Go find that information for yourself, I promise you'll find the results aren't what drug users and drug advocacy groups like NORML claim it to be.

Re:That's how they did it! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176795)

It's spectacularly ignorant to ignore the fact that marijuana is addictive, and this has been established for a number of years now.

GP didn't ignore anything. He simply pointed out that referring to marijuana users as addicts is just as dumb as referring to beer drinkers as alcoholics. You really need to take your sermons elsewhere.

Re: That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176905)

You need to be aware ALL things can be addictive, and there is a scale.

If broccoli is a 1, pot is a 7, and cocaine, sugar, caffeine are 20+.

There are far, far more harmful things that are legal than pot.

So my argument and many others is to be sensible and treat pot in the middle, not as an extreme like heroin.

Re: That's how they did it! (2)

tom's a-cold (253195) | about 2 months ago | (#47177731)

You can only say that all things can be addictive if your definition of additctiveness is stretched to the point of meaninglessness. A more sensible definition is that, unless there are physical withdrawal symptoms, it's not an addictive substance. It can still be possible to be a compulsive user of non-addictive substances, just like you can be a compulsive watcher of TV or a compulsive eater of grapefruit. But those things are just metaphorically "addictive."

Re: That's how they did it! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 2 months ago | (#47177809)

Ok, I think it's time to come out and admit it: I'm an oxygen addict. I can't even go for five minutes without. I've tried to stop, but it's just too hard. And I know how poisonous the crap is, I mean, it literally makes stuff burn up but I just can't stop.

Re: That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176921)

Educate yourself. Pot least addictive compared to legal substances.

http://www.tfy.drugsense.org/tfy/addictvn.htm

Re: That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47177083)

False argument. Nobody is arguing "how" addictive marijuana is, simply that it _is_ addictive.

drugsense.org is a biased drug advocacy website. Please use a reputable, non-biased, peer reviewed source if you really want to make a valid point.

Hot Damn! (1)

s.petry (762400) | about 3 months ago | (#47177133)

A fight between 2 anonymous people. While entertaining for a while, we are always left wondering if the person is schizophrenic and is it crowded in your head? Worse than that however, is that we never have a clear winner. Well, I say "HIT HIM WITH YOUR PURSE YOU CRAZY BASTARD(S)!"

Re: That's how they did it! (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 2 months ago | (#47177813)

Try to find a peer reviewed source that doesn't depend on funding, i.e. doesn't need to pretend that every drug (illegal drug, of course, so nicotine, alcohol and caffeine are a-ok) is going to send you to your grave.

Re: That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47183687)

Reputable as the one of dea?

Re:That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47177817)

Let's face it, marijuana does about 500% less harm than alcohol, which destroys thousands of lifes and families every year. I can wholeheartedly recommend it to anyone in their early twenties as a substitute for getting drunk all the time, since alcohol is much more dangerous and literally destroys the brain.

Another thing worth mentioning is that practically all of these studies are conducted on extreme long-term consuments, which makes them pretty much worthless. You will likewise find bad effects when you study extreme consuments of sex, TV, computer games, Coca Cola and Bible studies.

Last but not least, so many people have smoked marijuana at some point in their life without experiencing significant adverse effects that the anti-marijuana advocates like you are in a clear minority. And rightly so.

Re:That's how they did it! (3, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 3 months ago | (#47176517)

[dailydot.com]

From here, the sequence of events is relatively undisputed. With Hammond equipped and as FBI agents reportedly watched on, AntiSec began plundering Stratforâ(TM)s financial information and personal records. Monsegur convinced Hammond and others to unknowingly transfer âoemultiple gigabytes of confidential dataâ to one of the FBIâ(TM)s servers. That included the roughly 60,000 credit card numbers and records for Stratfor customers that Hammond was ultimately charged with stealing.

This is going to piss off a lot of very powerful people who were on that customer & credit card list.

Re:That's how they did it! (1)

s.petry (762400) | about 3 months ago | (#47176869)

It should piss off a lot more than that.

Unfortunately this story will never see airtime so the majority of the public will never know what happened, let alone have a debate on why it's wrong.

Re:That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176533)

F that! I refuse to be pimped out by my government like some cheap street whore!! I have class, if they want me it's gonna cost them lots of weed and munchies and not one dime less.

Re:That's how they did it! (3, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176571)

Apparently that problem has been solved. All they really need to do is arrest the people who have the skills that they need, and then coerce them into doing the work that needs to be done.

It's worse than that.

In the name of counterterrorism, the FBI scouts around for a radicalized lone-wolf guy, giving him a fake bomb plot, a fake partner, and a fake bomb, and arresting him when he pulls the trigger on the fake bomb.

And you know, sometimes that strikes me as unconscionable; I mean, he's got the motive, but would the guy have ever tried to harm someone (even with a fake bomb) if he hadn't been given the means and opportunity by the FBI? But I can understand the practice. It's not entrapment, and it's a legitimate part of what we call "good old-fashioned policework."

But this isn't the cybersecurity equivalent of giving flight training and bombmaking lessons to wannabe terrorists and arresting them before the fake plot gets anywhere near the point of harming them. This is the cybersecurity of giving flight training and bombmaking lessons to real terrorists and then letting them execute the plan with real airplanes, real bombs, and real victims before making the arrest.

It is utterly unconscionable, and it makes the FBI responsible for the damage their hired/duped criminals do. That the harm is financial, and that it is inflicted upon the innocent by means of a keyboard rather than a bomb, makes the FBI's actions here no less unconscionable.

I am embarassed for this country, and feel pity for its citizens.

Re:That's how they did it! (2)

s.petry (762400) | about 3 months ago | (#47176915)

Well spoken. I was honestly about to type up very similar in a Car analogy (not joking) instead of an airplane. That people don't understand how this is worse than just simple "coercion" is baffling. This is much worse than coercion, because the FBI watched as real crimes occurred. Crimes that the US claimed were an act of war to be more precise.

The whole point of defending citizens and preventing crimes has been thrown out of the window for some reason, and very few seem to be paying attention.

As a secondary example, if the police arrest a drug dealer they _can_ legally allow them to turn over higher level players in exchange for pleas. They can not legally allow the suspect back on the streets and supervise their drug sales while they wait for a rival dealer to show up. The police in that case, and the FBI in TFA, are behaving criminally and should be charged as criminals.

Feel free to debate me regarding my opinion, but please save the fallacy responses (like the appeals to emotion I can already see coming).

Re:That's how they did it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47177095)

Don't forget prison is a popular place for experimenting with mind control.

Re:That's how they did it! (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 2 months ago | (#47177855)

usa really needs to sort out it's "it's ok to enable crime to catch criminals" policies. it's fucking stupid and most of the rest of the world considers such acts criminal anyways..

note that no such work "needed to be done". it served no purpose for the USA even.

Attacking GOVERMENT servers under FBI guidance??? (4, Insightful)

aod7br (573614) | about 3 months ago | (#47176387)

Attacking GOVERMENT servers under FBI guidance??? WTF is an internal north american police agency doing messing with brazilian goverment sites?? Omg, long time I dont care to login in slashdot to post something, but here it is:
VA SE FUDER US goverment
Fucking with my country supporting a military coup and keeping those murderers in power for 30 years wasnt enough? You are trying AGAIN to undermine a democratic goverment just because we have a non automatic alignment policy with the US on foreign affairs? Just because we supported democraticaly ELECTED Chaves and others in south america? All american authorities should be considered persona non grata in Brazil, and ALL US goverment agents related to FBI and NSA should be imediately ARRESTED in brazillian soil. I am tired of american goverment double face with friendly nations

Re:Attacking GOVERMENT servers under FBI guidance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176887)

VA SE FUDER US goverment

(Posting anon to maintain mods.)

I can't decide whether to moderate this +1 Flamebait or -1 Regrettable But Understandable.

... or vice versa.

Re:Attacking GOVERMENT servers under FBI guidance? (3, Interesting)

rtb61 (674572) | about 3 months ago | (#47176975)

I will add a minor correction for you, It is always important to recognise the reality of what is going on. Simply blaming the government of the US, is not really accurate, that aligns too much of the fault to the bulk of the citizens of US (although they are most definitely partially to blame). You need to call it the Corporate States of America. Basically the US government and it's Agencies corruptly taken over to further the interests of psychopathic US corporate executives not just US corporations but Multi-National Corporations (so not even just Americans).

Your war is not really with the US government at all, just with the Corporations that run it and those psychopathic corporate executives and the major investors who run those corporations. So cut of the head of the snake http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S... [wikipedia.org] and the problem will go away. Don't blame or fight the puppet, the US government and it's agencies, get rid of the puppet masters examples like the Koch(head) Boys, and the problem will go away as the bulk of US citizens regain control of their own government. Help them, save you, from themselves.

Re:Attacking GOVERMENT servers under FBI guidance? (3, Interesting)

s.petry (762400) | about 3 months ago | (#47177023)

I agree with your points, but will add that there were a few other motives. One I believe is a bigger target than Brazil.

1. Anonymous was a pain in the ass to corrupt US corporations and Government agencies. If you remember, US sites were being hacked and defaced for the same exact reasons claimed for defacing Brazilian sites. Anonymous was leaking classified documents implicating US agencies of war crimes and corruption, civil rights violations against OWS and other activist groups. In other words, a primary motive was attacking anonymous members to slow down their campaign in the US. IMHO "Sabu" is full of shit in his exit statement from the courts. Anonymous was the primary target because they are a threat to the corrupt insiders in the US.

2. Fuck with non-US aligned countries. Brazil was a target, but so was Syria, Pakistan, Iran, and Nigeria. Turkey and Pakistan are mentioned, but I'm guessing those were real targets of anonymous because they are corrupt and not a traditionally vocal allies of the US. Interestingly "US" is omitted from this information but was the reason they arrested Sabu to begin with. That they could fuck with so many countries was a huge side effect of number 1, but not the primary motive. Notice after all of these arrests, Anonymous greatly reduces the attacks against US companies and Government agencies. Notice too that the vocal allies of the US are omitted from these attacks (UK, Germany, France, Spain, etc...).

3. As someone else mentioned, including Sabu in his exit statement, this a case of the FBI trying to make themselves look good. I come to that conclusion because there are exactly 2 very brief mentions in TFA about the legality of the FBIs actions and neither are direct.

Attacking GOVERMENT servers under FBI guidance??? (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47178467)

Another Brazilian.

Just MHO. Though I mostly agree with OP, "support" is too strong a word in the present case. We acknowledge a democratically elected Politician (the late Chaves). I've never heard any praise to him in Brazil; exactly the opposite, at least some of us think the King of Spain was right to say "Why don't you shut up?" to him. We have high regards for all our neighbors -- and Venezuela is an important one. We're trying to rid the neighborhood from external dividing influences, better to make a continent of equals, where union is put at service of all democracies.

The USA must grow up and learn that the "big stick" idea, while great throughout the Cold War, is a liability nowadays. You don't sit to do peace talks or hope to have a participating voice in a meeting if your first act is to carefully put a revolver on the table. People stand up, move to another room and let you and your gun alone talking to the walls.

Also, putting the blame on corporations -- while possibly accurate -- leads to nowhere, because nobody has the power (or should have) to somehow control or influence other countries' citizens or companies. Which means: either you control your own country or nobody will do it for you. If you can't, things are FUBAR and we'll have a rogue nation without government to make things even worse.

Brazil certainly is no model of organization, our flag notwithstanding, but the recent news about some intelligence departments going wild and the paranoia of some governments regarding information issues are a threat to everyone's liberties all over the world.

You really should have a Friendship Secretary/Minister. Having solely military ones will not lead you to better relationships. You should have someone to tell you how such spying is bad for yourselves.

Re:Attacking GOVERMENT servers under FBI guidance? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47178681)

Maybe they are trying to avoid a communist South America ruled by Cuba.
Stop crying and just research how much money is being sent to Cuba by those countries (and how they "buy" votes) and you will figure it out.

It's easy to be a destructive douche (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176389)

Quite another to create constructively useful things in the art & science of computing.

APK

P.S.=> Giving this complete ASSHOLE "Sabu" any type of press is utterly ridiculous... why? See what I wrote above, & "nuff said"... apk

lol Sabu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176557)

Why do we continue to build Sabu into something he wasn't. He was just another angry script kiddie. This is no better than people making 'weev' out to be a hacker.

Re:lol Sabu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176607)

Act of war (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47176605)

Given that hacking is considered an act of war, did the FBI just help wage war against another nation? Shouldn't they need someone to give them the ok before they go around the world causing trouble for everyone but the people they were supposed to catch?

Up next: H&HS take over prison executions (5, Insightful)

pla (258480) | about 3 months ago | (#47176837)

Seriously, WTF, US government agencies? Did I miss the announcement of "opposite decade"?

We have the DoJ obstructing justice by intentionally destroying evidence;
we have the BATF running guns to Mexican cartels;
we have ICE taking captured illegals out of local police custody and setting them loose on the streets;
we have the NSA spying on the single target off limits to them, with a true patriot under asylum in fucking Russia for pointing that out...

And now we have the FBI coordinating cyberattacks on the government of another country?

Can we just stop pretending, and admit the government has absolutely no interest whatsoever in obeying the will of We The People?

Decade? (1)

s.petry (762400) | about 3 months ago | (#47177173)

This has actually been happening for a very long time, but I'm glad to see that more and more people are waking up to the game. I also think that things are escalating in terms of corruption so it's getting easier for people to see.

If anyone has doubts (not you per say), look at how many people were arrested for the blackmail campaign against Ross Perot, in fact be amazed at how much media coverage it received. Look at the Iowa primary issues with Ron Paul, and be amazed at how he was treated by media (my kid at 11 years old figured that out on his own, I was proud). The Franklin Cover Up is another great piece to study, and lets not forget about Operation Mockingbird, COINTELPRO, The Clinton Chronicles, and wholly fuck I could really make a long list so will stop by stating this: There are plenty of investigative books and articles on the corruption in the US going back to the 50s at least.

It takes public awareness to incite change, so start waking people up to what's going on any way you can.

Re:Decade? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47177515)

As an observer here in Australia, I was shocked at the treatment of Ron Paul by the main stream US media during his run for presidential candidate.
What was even more shocking to me was how few Americans seemed to notice or give a shit. It was so goddamn blatant I was expecting an uproar...marching...protesting...rioting...something! Nope...barely a fucking squeak.
Corporations run the show and the sheep will eat any old shit their fed.

Re:Decade? (1)

s.petry (762400) | about 2 months ago | (#47179577)

In fairness, there were some protests. As with OWS protesters were treated with hostility and protests were ignored by US Media. In fact the quote from the head of the Republican Caucus stated on public radio "We don't care what the people say, Ron Paul will not win the Iowa primary". National media refused to pick this up, there were no investigations into corruption (and yes there were several lawsuits and petitions requesting such), and the majority of Americans are simply blinded to the problem. These people have gotten very good at using media to manipulate the public.

Since you are in Australia, I don't know what you saw but I'll explain what Americans saw. Ron Paul was referred to by all US media as "that crazy congressmen", and his positions were all labelled "whacky". TV clips were edited down to a sentence that would demonstrate that he was just that. During televised debates he was not shown giving answers after he won the first televised debate, he was simply cut from viewing or edited with commercial interruptions. The number one question he was asked by media in the last campaign was "How do you feel about being Xs running mate?" where X was any of the other candidates including the worst of them. His answer became laughing at the interviewer because they refused to let him talk about being the front candidate.

As an outsider I am guessing it's easy to see the corruption because your sources are different, and it probably helps that the celebrity status of a politician means much less to you than it does a US citizen. My son was taught to ignore celebrity status as anything of value, so he saw through the game easily. Celebrity worship to an average American is quite a powerful tool to the "insiders".

Up next: H&HS take over prison executions (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 months ago | (#47177635)

You forgot funding of "rebels" by the CIA in, not limited to, but including the Middle East and Africa.

Re:Up next: H&HS take over prison executions (2)

Opportunist (166417) | about 2 months ago | (#47177827)

Never forget: September 11th [wikipedia.org] .

Yes, 1973. What did you expect?

Re:Up next: H&HS take over prison executions (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47178391)

Seriously, WTF, US government agencies? Did I miss the announcement of "opposite decade"? We have the DoJ obstructing justice by intentionally destroying evidence; we have the BATF running guns to Mexican cartels; we have ICE taking captured illegals out of local police custody and setting them loose on the streets; we have the NSA spying on the single target off limits to them, with a true patriot under asylum in fucking Russia for pointing that out... And now we have the FBI coordinating cyberattacks on the government of another country? Can we just stop pretending, and admit the government has absolutely no interest whatsoever in obeying the will of We The People?

This is what happens when you put a "brotha" in charge. See Detroit if you have further questions.

Candid question (1)

toutankh (1544253) | about 2 months ago | (#47179581)

The FBI coordinated and sanctioned criminal acts, for which people found guilty were sentenced to several years in jail. There is apparently solid evidence. So I would expect heads to roll and whoever is responsible for that at the FBI to be sentenced to at least as many years in jail as those already found guilty. It is not going to happen, but I do not see why. This is really a candid question from a non-US citizen: what part of the US constitution prevents a US citizen from prosecuting the FBI for that?

Re:Candid question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47181049)

Two words. "National" "Security".

Re:Candid question (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47181227)

This is really a candid question from a non-US citizen: what part of the US constitution prevents a US citizen from prosecuting the FBI for that?

The Constitution? Who needs that when you have Catch-22?

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