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Oxford Internet Institute Creates Internet "Tube" Map

samzenpus posted about 7 months ago | from the follow-the-lines dept.

The Internet 56

First time accepted submitter Jahta (1141213) writes "The Oxford Internet Institute has created a schematic of the world's international fiber-optic links in the style of the famous London Tube map. The schematic also highlights nodes where censorship and surveillance are known to be in operation. The map uses data sourced from cablemap.info. Each node has been assigned to a country, and all nodes located in the same country have been collapsed into a single node. The resulting network has been then abstracted."

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Fighting Censorship (-1, Troll)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 7 months ago | (#46658643)

The schematic also highlights nodes where censorship and surveillance are known to be in operation

Put a big ol' green scissors smack on Mozilla.com. May as well throw in the unblinking eye of watchful intolerance.

Re:Fighting Censorship (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46658741)

the map is a bit of a troll. according to it brasil is the center
of the universe.

How do you gauge censorship ? (-1, Flamebait)

Taco Cowboy (5327) | about 6 months ago | (#46659085)

The "tube map" attempts to mark countries where "censorship" happens, but I feel that the effort is still a little bit wanting.

For example, how does one account for the "grassroot censorship" ?

What I mean by "grassroot censorship" is akin to what happened to the ex-honcho of Mozilla. Just because his personal donation to a political fund he had been hounded by thousands of fanatics who organized a netwide witch hunt, to the tune of asking people to remove Mozilla browsers from their devices.

How do you account for that kind of censorship ??

Re:How do you gauge censorship ? (5, Insightful)

Sique (173459) | about 6 months ago | (#46659273)

It isn't. It's called censorship if someone else is hiding information from you or denying access. If you don't use Mozilla because you don't like the head honcho for what reason ever, it's called free choice.

Re:How do you gauge censorship ? (1)

Kremmy (793693) | about 6 months ago | (#46663317)

I just wish they had made this decision regarding JavaScript the moment the contributions came to light. I kinda get the impression this guy was one of the few people in the organization qualified to step up, especially given that one of the things I heard being an issue was that he was procured internally. Unfortunately, as people are finding out more and more, being disrespectful and hateful of people actually does have real life real world consequences. This situation was one of those consequences. Paula Deen's situation was one of those consequences. Duck Hunter Guy's situation was one of those consequences.

It's really amusing to me how readily this is lost on people.

Submarine cable map (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46658681)

That's missing a few cables -- the Submarine Cable Map [submarinecablemap.com] has more
(and with the proper names as well)

Re:Submarine cable map (3, Insightful)

ModelX (182441) | about 6 months ago | (#46658873)

It's also imagining direct connections in south-east Asia that actually route via Hong Kong and Singapore. Haven't they run traceroute? This tube map seems to be an artistic project compared to the submarine cable map.

Re:Submarine cable map (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46659577)

The submarine cable map site run by chinese company Huawei is a better map but it's missing the odd detail as well - where's the label for Tibet?

Re:Submarine cable map (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46659883)

wooosh?

Re:Submarine cable map (1)

AdamHaun (43173) | about 6 months ago | (#46665295)

That map is so much better and more informative than the tube map that I don't know why the latter exists at all. I know it's supposed to be a simplification, but if you condense that many cables into one route you end up with a map of countries that border the sea, not network routes. For example, there's nothing on the tube map to indicate that the UK is only one or two hops from Japan, or that the Seychelles are at the end of a line, even though it's clearly visible in both your map and the tube map's questionably accurate source material. [cablemap.info]

Mandatory (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46658733)

We already knew the Internet is a series of tubes.

Re:Mandatory (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 6 months ago | (#46659569)

Sort of like intestines, right? But it requires guts to say it in public.

Re:Mandatory (1)

rujasu (3450319) | about 6 months ago | (#46660029)

Yeah. If they had made a schematic of a truck, that would have been all wrong.

Re:Mandatory (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46660711)

I kind of expected it to look like a station wagon full of backup tapes...
And don't you just hate having to tell the boss that the network has been then abstracted? How will he ever find lolcats? [cheezburger.com]

Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (4, Insightful)

NoKaOi (1415755) | about 7 months ago | (#46658777)

The US has the "surveillance" symbol and the "imprisonment" symbol. Shouldn't that equate to censorship? "We're gonna watch everything you do, and we're gonna imprison you if we don't like what you're doing by calling it 'terrorism' or a 'national security threat,' but no, we're not censoring you, you can say whatever you want!"

Re:Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 7 months ago | (#46658807)

Goodness no! Remember, citizens of the free world, it works like this:

Godless commie chinese and those fanatic heathen arabs we buy oil from? "Censorship" and "Surveillance".

The Good Guys? "Content Filtering" and "Lawful Intercept Capabilities".

I'm glad we cleared up that misconception.

Re:Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46658835)

Good point, they got it wrong for 'GBR' as well, here in the UK we have censorship (beyond blocking the evil stuff) though the imprisonment I think is reserved for anything that is a criminal offence in its own right.

Re:Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46659029)

Good point, they got it wrong for 'GBR' as well, here in the UK we have censorship (beyond blocking the evil stuff) though the imprisonment I think is reserved for anything that is a criminal offence in its own right.

So then it's not wrong is it.

Re:Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46659583)

Really (and it's not so much the map's fault as RWB), it's kind of bullshit that we get single boolean flags for those three issues, and that their use is so politically-motivated. A lot of the unmarked countries, in practice, exhibit these issues in very real ways, and there are *substantial* qualitative differences in the pragmatic effects in the flagged countries. It's fashionable for Americans to hate on themselves and flag themselves for these offenses, but we're in a completely different (and better) state on these issues than our peer flagees for the most part.

Re:Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (2)

necro81 (917438) | about 6 months ago | (#46659637)

Try living in mainland China for a few years, or one of several countries in the Middle East, or The Sovi...er, I mean Russia, and then come back to the USA and talk about the relative levels of censorship.

Re:Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46660413)

If you think you are more free in the United States than you are in China, you are delusional.

I think I'll go by my own personal experience rather than some stupid slashbot who couldn't find China on a map if you spotted him Mongolia and Vietnam, thank you very much.

Re:Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46662003)

Bullshit. The Republicans are more oppressive than any of those amateurs you listed. They are better funded and more fanatical. I don't think /. talks enough about all of the people in the US put in prison by the Republicans for using the Internet. The GOPpers hate us for using the Internet and want to punish us for that.

Re:Surveillance + Imprisonment != Censorship? (3, Funny)

Mozai (3547) | about 6 months ago | (#46660363)

I'm reminded of an old joke from Poland:
"Oh, we have freedom of speech just like in America! Freedom after speech, not as much."

Times have changed.

It's not a truck... (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 6 months ago | (#46658869)

It's a series of tubes!

Uhg (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46660383)

Can we stop mocking the tubes analogy?

Anyone that knows anything about what happens in routers under load will tell you that "tubes" is a great analogy for packets moving through the long queues in routers. It's that queuing behavior of packets in a store and forward network is a big part of what makes the internet the internet and not just a series of wires or fibers.

Re:Uhg (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 6 months ago | (#46660517)

I was tempted to put a disclaimer to pretty much this effect, but felt that I wasn't really saying anythng about the analogy.

I do agree with you. Networking people use a lot of plumbing related metaphors.

Re:Uhg (1)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | about 6 months ago | (#46662765)

Personally it's always been the "series" part that didn't sit well with me. There's nothing "series" about the way they are connected!

Re:Uhg (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46671035)

> Can we stop mocking the tubes analogy?

That was an analogy? Ah, ok! That explains everything. :)

"censorship" (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46658895)

Don't see a little "censorship" logo on GBR, despite IWF, court orders requiring denial of access to whole file sharing web sites (not just infringing files), a torrent of laws restricting the sort of speech permitted on the Internet (and anywhere else), etc.

And GBR is the only European country with known Internet surveillance - orly?

This map really isn't very good.

Re:"censorship" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46661931)

Don't see a little "censorship" logo on GBR, despite IWF

IWF membership is voluntary. Using their cleenfeed filter is not mandatory for ISPs.

court orders requiring denial of access to whole file sharing web sites (not just infringing files)

Only covers six(?) service providers

a torrent of laws restricting the sort of speech permitted on the Internet (and anywhere else), etc.

just making it illegal is not censorship

We're well on our way to internet censorship, and it's clearly the government's aim, but we're still not quite there yet.

The map is Biased (4, Interesting)

phayes (202222) | about 6 months ago | (#46658959)

The data used to create it is from Reporteurs sans Frontières. France's DGSE performs the same mass surveillance of the internet & telephone data as the US & UK but nobody talks about it because:
A: It's legal here for the government to snoop on anyone they want. Foreign nationals, French citizens, whatever...
B: The government has a level of control over the press not present in the US/UK and discourages reporters here from talking about it.

RSF knows that this is the case but somehow France is conveniently left off the list of surveillance states? Suuurrree...

On a side note:
I have moved much of my home browsing over to a tablet. Beta is now being foist upon me even when logged in and the /?nobeta=1 URL trick no longer functions. Way to go slashdot, I've been a regular for close to 2 decades but now only visit when sitting down in front of a PC/Mac. Still losing readership? I'm an example.

Re:The map is Biased (1, Insightful)

geekmux (1040042) | about 6 months ago | (#46659313)

The data used to create it is from Reporteurs sans Frontières. France's DGSE performs the same mass surveillance of the internet & telephone data as the US & UK but nobody talks about it because: A: It's legal here for the government to snoop on anyone they want. Foreign nationals, French citizens, whatever... B: The government has a level of control over the press not present in the US/UK and discourages reporters here from talking about it.

RSF knows that this is the case but somehow France is conveniently left off the list of surveillance states? Suuurrree...

On a side note: I have moved much of my home browsing over to a tablet. Beta is now being foist upon me even when logged in and the /?nobeta=1 URL trick no longer functions. Way to go slashdot, I've been a regular for close to 2 decades but now only visit when sitting down in front of a PC/Mac. Still losing readership? I'm an example.

Uh, while I appreciate your insight and information here as to why the map is biased, the bias is far more obvious than that.

Just ask anyone who doesn't live near underground public transportation (the other 95% of the planet) staring at this kitschy London Tube theme, wondering how the hell we've devolved from a world map overnight.

A mechanic may work under a hood all day long, but you certainly don't see them explaining geography using a timing belt, radiator, and three engine mounts.

Re:The map is Biased (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46659687)

Whatever point you're making is pretty much lost amongst the sarcasm. You start off talking about bias, then you seem to be claiming that topological graph representations only make sense if you use similar maps every day, then you make some completely non-sequiteur comment about mechanics that I guess is supposed to be a metaphor, but for what?

Re:The map is Biased (0)

geekmux (1040042) | about 6 months ago | (#46659771)

Whatever point you're making is pretty much lost amongst the sarcasm. You start off talking about bias, then you seem to be claiming that topological graph representations only make sense if you use similar maps every day, then you make some completely non-sequiteur comment about mechanics that I guess is supposed to be a metaphor, but for what?

The mechanic was meant to be a methphor for those ignorant enough to not pull their head out of the Tube and realize a global representation should not be overlayed onto a subterranean map representing a few square miles that 5% of the world remotely understands or recognizes.

As I said, the mechanic does not go home and teach their kids geography from under the hood of a car. The end result is what we have here, kitchy art.

Re:The map is Biased (1)

phayes (202222) | about 6 months ago | (#46661063)

Had the map been labeled in chinese or spanish or some other language on a non-english website, you might actually have a comprehensible point. Given that it is labeled in english where the tube map is a recognizable cultural reference point for a significant part of of the population, all that comes across is your distaste of london or the london tube map.

I've never lived in England yet even growing up in the US I recognized the tube map style as distinctive. Your metaphors may be clear to you, but not to others so labeling them as ignorant when it is you that is being obscure is just ego stroking.

Re:The map is Biased (1)

geekmux (1040042) | about 6 months ago | (#46661577)

Had the map been labeled in chinese or spanish or some other language on a non-english website, you might actually have a comprehensible point. Given that it is labeled in english where the tube map is a recognizable cultural reference point for a significant part of of the population, all that comes across is your distaste of london or the london tube map.

I've never lived in England yet even growing up in the US I recognized the tube map style as distinctive. Your metaphors may be clear to you, but not to others so labeling them as ignorant when it is you that is being obscure is just ego stroking.

The world is flat, and the other 95% of the planet who can access that data have little use for it because of it's abnormal representation. It's distinctive alright, as distinctive of any other artwork that I'm not expecting much function out of other than to hang there on the wall. Maps are designed to have purpose and generally like math are meant to be understood as a universal design. You know, kind of how we all settled on what the continents look like on world maps.

Perhaps we should ask Disney to publish a supplemental using their "distinctive" theme park map? Better yet, let's ask McDonalds. At least a LOT of people on the planet would recognize that menu as cartography.

Re:The map is Biased (1)

deadweight (681827) | about 6 months ago | (#46665287)

OTOH it made instant sense to me. It looks exactly like the Metro map in DC, which I guess they copied from London. Been awhile since I rode the tube.

Re:The map is Biased (1)

phayes (202222) | about 6 months ago | (#46668251)

This map had purpose: to try and shame the countries with a free press that perform mass surveillance, but in particular the US & UK.
The map had a form similar to that of the London tube & DC subway.

That the data used to create the map is based on incomplete and false data is more important to most than that you think the form is inaccurate.

Re:The map is Biased (1)

geekmux (1040042) | about 6 months ago | (#46668889)

This map had purpose: to try and shame the countries with a free press that perform mass surveillance, but in particular the US & UK. The map had a form similar to that of the London tube & DC subway.

That the data used to create the map is based on incomplete and false data is more important to most than that you think the form is inaccurate.

Yes, I do agree with you on that point, but it's not really that important to me. I don't stress over exercises in futility, and attempting to even remotely guess at the intelligence-gathering capabilities of the world's most powerful governments is exactly that, regardless of leaks.

You would have better luck trying to estimate the hundreds of trillions of corporate dollars hidden in tax havens.

The map format was yet another exercise in futility for those attempting to find a purpose with this by creating global impact and awareness. We may disagree on this, but a traditional format would have made a hell of a lot more sense here with a global dataset.

seems they did not know what they are doing (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46659057)

as a example why is turkey not on the censor list ... seems that the people that made the map never tried to watch porn in turkey

Censorship and surveillance missing (2)

Bender Unit 22 (216955) | about 6 months ago | (#46659193)

Many european countries practice both censorship and surveillance.

Re:Censorship and surveillance missing (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 6 months ago | (#46659823)

I presume censorship means direct government censorship at the connection, rather than punishment after the fact (For example in the UK, not all ISPs are filtered, even by cleanfeed; in much of Europe promoting fascism is illegal but not blocked). Surveillance - while I would not be surprised if all countries were spying on the traffic - has only been proven to a reasonable standard in a few countries. I think they're using information from Reporters Without Borders.

Stylised & very simplified (4, Informative)

Teun (17872) | about 6 months ago | (#46659247)

I saw a comment on the importance of the Hongkong and Singapore exchanges for Asian communications, in a similar vein the AMS-IX is totally missing, one of the world's largest Internet exchanges and peering points.

But it's still an interesting map on a very interesting website!

US has imprisonment badge - BS (3, Insightful)

towermac (752159) | about 6 months ago | (#46659399)

You can't go to jail in the US just for illegal use of the internet. You can for looking at kiddie porn, or threatening somebody, but those things were illegal before we had an internet. You can freely read about Marxism, Nazism, Al-Qaeda musings... with no fear. If they caught you being part of Al-Qaeda through the internet, they would have caught you before, through the telephone, post, or surveillance. Ed Snowden has shown us that lately the NSA goes too far in surveillance, but that's not the same thing (yet), as a Cuba and the like.

Nobody is in jail here for reading or posting political views.

The imprisonment badge on the US is BS, and was the whole purpose of making this political statement of a silly map.

Re:US has imprisonment badge - BS (1, Interesting)

orzetto (545509) | about 6 months ago | (#46659683)

You can't go to jail in the US just for illegal use of the internet.

Yes you can, google up Justin River Carter. He made a hyperbolic, sarcastic comment on Facebook, and he's looking at up to 10 years in jail [washingtonpost.com] . Another case is Cameron D'Ambrosio's [ibtimes.com] . The magic word is terrorism: if anyone is scared by what you say or says they are, you are fornicated.

You can for looking at kiddie porn, or threatening somebody, but those things were illegal before we had an internet.

Same you can say about any country with the imprisonment mark. It was illegal to mock Mohammed in Pakistan before the Internet, and now too. The imprisonment icon means, "you can go to jail after unwarranted, sweeping wiretapping of your Internet connection".

Re:US has imprisonment badge - BS (2)

towermac (752159) | about 6 months ago | (#46660343)

Yes, I read about Carter. It appears to be a gross overreaction by the Texas authorities. Although technically, he did threaten to shoot kindergartners and other violence. He's had a restraining order against him before.

A Canadian reported him. He was not caught by surveillance. Your example is bogus.

Re:US has imprisonment badge - BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46660541)

One of the comments appears to be a response to an earlier comment in which someone called Carter crazy. Carter's retort was: "I'm fucked in the head alright, I think I'ma SHOOT UP A KINDERGARTEN [sic]."

Carter followed with "AND WATCH THE BLOOD OF THE INNOCENT RAIN DOWN."

When a person writing under the profile name "Hannah Love" responded with "i hope you [burn] in hell you fucking prick," Carter put the cherry on top: "AND EAT THE BEATING HEART OF ONE OF THEM."

...
Ok, maybe your second link will

Cameron D’Ambrosio, an 18-year-old aspiring rapper from Methuen, Mass., posted lyrics on his Facebook page that read, “F--- a boston bomb wait till u see the s--- I do, I’m be famous rapping, and beat every murder charge that comes across me!”

... o_O

Where do you find these assholes?

Re:US has imprisonment badge - BS (1)

budgenator (254554) | about 6 months ago | (#46663001)

So do we award Canada a surveilence icon because one of it's nanny-state supporting residence narced out Justin Carter to a whackaloon county prosecuter in Texas?

Re:US has imprisonment badge - BS (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46659703)

Nobody is in jail here for reading or posting political views.

Yup, no political prisoners in the US at all [afgj.org] .

Re:US has imprisonment badge - BS (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46660095)

Almost all of those are due to various crimes such as murder. If they are truly innocent then this is more of a matter of government corruption than political prisoners. They are not jailed for their political views. They might be jailed because they were framed by some over zealous prosecutors trying to make a name for themselves. I think this is quite a bit different than governments that make it clear that dissension is not allowed. The map is BS,

Re:US has imprisonment badge - BS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46661713)

If you even knew how to read, you would see that the Oxford map was made using the conclusions from Reporters Without Borders; it was that organization that labeled the US with an "imprisonment badge." Their reasoning for such a conclusion on the US is in part due to the seven uses of the 1917 Espionage Act by the Obama Administration (compared to only 3 uses ever prior to the Obama Administration).

Here is a prime example:
On 12 September 2012, the journalist Barrett Brown was arrested by the FBI and held in a federal prison. The charges against him could add up to 105 years in prison if he was convicted. The journalist was investigating the contents of over five million internal emails released through a hack on the private intelligence company, Stratfor. Brown was charged with 12 offences after he posted a link to the site that had published the emails.

Note that he didn't post the data, just a link, which is the purpose of HTTP.

Here is the section on the US [rsf.org] from the Reporters Without Borders report.

And here is the full Enemies of the Internet 2014 [rsf.org] report.

The imprisonment badge isn't just based on imprisonment for political views, but imprisonment and the threat thereof, for being a journalist and/or whistleblower. Of which the US has a number of people jailed or has open charges against. It is about whether people are being jailed over freedom of information. We would have had another with Aaron Swartz had he not tragically committed suicide in the face of unethical persecution by the state.

Lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46659895)

Lol at the USA listed as an "enemy of the internet". Sure, the NSA blah blah blah, but to say they are anywhere near as bad as the Middle East or China is just ridiculous.

Ha, See Ted Stevens was RIGHT! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46660055)

Old Teddy was right all those years ago, it is just a bunch of tubes!

Ted Stevens would be so happy (1, Funny)

Virtucon (127420) | about 6 months ago | (#46660065)

Good Old Ted Stevens [wikipedia.org] was proven right once and for all! It is a bunch of tubes!!!

Great to see OP blast the Republicans (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46662061)

They're so stupid to believe in the tube thing. I can't believe that years later they're still constantly making that claim. /. is right in pointing-out how stupid they are. They hate technology and hate people that use it so we need to remain vigilant against their attacks. As the excellent graphic shows, the Republicans are putting people in prison for using the Internet. I urge everyone here to not use the new registered accounts and remain proud ACs. That makes it harder for the Republicans to find us even with /.'s help. I don't think /. would ever go full on CONservative and turn-over subscription information to the FBI, but it has happened at other sites.

Too late (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46663105)

Search.xxx has already created a "tube map."
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