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Canonical Shutting Down Ubuntu One File Services

Unknown Lamer posted about 7 months ago | from the at-least-we-get-code dept.

Ubuntu 161

jones_supa (887896) writes "Wanting to focus their efforts on their most important strategic initiatives and ensuring that the company is not spread too thin, Canonical is shutting down Ubuntu One file services. With other services now regularly offering from 25 GB to 50 GB of free storage, the personal cloud storage space wasn't a sustainable place for Canonical. As of today, it will no longer be possible to purchase storage or music from the Ubuntu One store. The Ubuntu One software will not be included in the upcoming Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, and the Ubuntu One apps in older versions of Ubuntu and in the Ubuntu, Google, and Apple stores will be updated appropriately.

The current services will be unavailable from 1 June 2014; user content will remain available for download until 31 July, at which time it will be deleted. For a spark of solace, the company promises to open source the backend code."

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It's a pity (2, Interesting)

nicomede (1228020) | about 7 months ago | (#46638835)

I for one used this service to share files between my Ubuntu desktops, it worked seamlessly. It is especially useful for development files (programs and scripts) that I share between my different workplaces.

If anyone has a replacement suggestion that integrates well with the Ubuntu desktop, I would be glad to hear from it.

Re:It's a pity (5, Informative)

pelayo (857356) | about 7 months ago | (#46638863)

What about Dropbox or Owncloud?

Re:It's a pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638931)

2gb of space for dropbox. Its a pittance.

Re:It's a pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639267)

Better than 0 GB, no?

Re:It's a pity (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639407)

Having yes or no at the end of a sentence invalidates anything you posted because it makes you sound like an ignorant nigger.

Re:It's a pity (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639501)

And you would know, right? Your momma fucks at least 10 of them a day, no ?

Re:It's a pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639651)

Is he the son of Agatha Christie?

Dropbox as a Replacement (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638933)

I've used it and it works nicely across multiple Linux Distros though for Dev files, why not a github account?

captcha = hooked

Re:It's a pity (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638961)

Learn to use rsync over ssh.

To whose server? (1)

tepples (727027) | about 7 months ago | (#46641177)

Learn to use rsync over ssh.

What's the server's hostname?

FTP? (1, Interesting)

Viol8 (599362) | about 7 months ago | (#46638975)

Seriously , why do so many people thinking transfering files is some new problem still looking for a solution? I can understand it for Windows users but Linux users really should know better.

Re:FTP? (1)

paskie (539112) | about 7 months ago | (#46639117)

For one, you need an FTP _server_ to exchange files (or your desktops need to be always-on, with public IP addresses). The same with rsync or ssh. I have one and I'm fine without these cloud services, but the point here is that people don't have to set up their own.

(A service that would allow an end-user to easily roll their own VPS or buy preconfigured RPi/whatever with pre-configured mail server, webmail client, file sharing etc. would be awesome. Some are in the works, none are ready yet. Which is why cloud services matter for users.)

Re:FTP? (1)

lister king of smeg (2481612) | about 7 months ago | (#46639559)

For one, you need an FTP _server_ to exchange files (or your desktops need to be always-on, with public IP addresses). The same with rsync or ssh. I have one and I'm fine without these cloud services, but the point here is that people don't have to set up their own.

(A service that would allow an end-user to easily roll their own VPS or buy preconfigured RPi/whatever with pre-configured mail server, webmail client, file sharing etc. would be awesome. Some are in the works, none are ready yet. Which is why cloud services matter for users.)

You don't need to install a ftp server as most distros come with ssh out of the box use that with scp. As for a public IP address no you don't need that either just use a dynamic dns service that's what I use on my server.

OwnCloud (2)

MrNaz (730548) | about 7 months ago | (#46639795)

I cannot understand why there is such scant mention of OwnCloud in this thread. It is THE solution to the problem of needing Dropbox like functionality on a self-hosted server.

Re:FTP? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639817)

As for a public IP address no you don't need that either just use a dynamic dns service that's what I use on my server.

What? You may not need a static IP address but you certainly need a public one. What good would dynamic DNS do if it was pointing to a 10.x.x.x IP or to a NAT IP?

Re:FTP? (1)

tepples (727027) | about 7 months ago | (#46641203)

If your ISP provides an IPv4 address in private-internet space, use the IPv6 address that it provides instead. If your ISP provides an IPv4 address in private-internet space and no IPv6 address, rent a VPS.

Re:FTP? (1)

xvan (2935999) | about 7 months ago | (#46639577)

What?????? I suppose you never heard of DDNS?

Re:FTP? (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 7 months ago | (#46639597)

For one, you need an FTP _server_ to exchange files (or your desktops need to be always-on, with public IP addresses).

Who needs a desktop? Pi works for me. It comes back up after power failures and everything.

Re:FTP? (5, Insightful)

hawguy (1600213) | about 7 months ago | (#46639153)

Seriously , why do so many people thinking transfering files is some new problem still looking for a solution? I can understand it for Windows users but Linux users really should know better.

Because FTP only supplies the transport layer - it's not going to automatically sync the 1000 files you dropped in the FTP directory and won't do the many-to-many replication that people use to share files among multiple desktops. Even rsync gets a little cumbersome for that without a central server that they all have access to, and if you're going to set up a server, you may as well set up something like OwnCloud [owncloud.org] .

Re:FTP? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 7 months ago | (#46640349)

Too bad LiveMesh kicked the bucket, as it was actually the perfect solution (once you got over the performance hit).

Re:FTP? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46640615)

Unless I'm very much mistaken BitSync should do that quite nicely for you.

Re:FTP? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639159)

Because in many cases we do not have a private server somewhere to store our files and we'd like to sync them seamlessly without having both computers turned on. I even have port forwarding set up for ssh on my home computer but only in case of an emergency in which I'd call my brother and ask him to turn it on because it's usually turned off.

You can just use dropbox but you'd have to copy the files from the dropbox folder with another tool and you would not get a simple UI for choosing what to share.

Re:FTP? (1)

Nimey (114278) | about 7 months ago | (#46639177)

FTP is not even in the same league of functionality or convenience, to say nothing of security. OwnCloud would be a more reasonable solution.

Re:FTP? (2)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about 7 months ago | (#46639241)

I like FTP as much as the next Slashdotter, but it's not a perfect overlap to the same problem that Dropbox/Gdrive/UbuntuOne solves.

FTP doesn't do delta syncs. While this is okay for a 50KB text file or even a 2MB spreadsheet, transferring a 1GB file in its entirety is undesirable.
FTP requires an "intentional transfer". You save locally, then you upload remotely. U1 et al does this as a single step.
FTP requires an open port on the receiving end, which is not always possible (e.g., public/corporate Wi-Fi). These services handle NAT traversal seamlessly.
FTP is sometimes blocked on residential internet connections. U1 is not.
FTP can only share files with another user if its structure is designed to accommodate it. Dropbox can share files using a simple "share" command (I don't know if U1 supports this).
FTP on mobile devices is a nightmare, either because iOS gets weird with its attempts to hide the "complexity" of a file system, or because Android doesn't. Again, Dropbox makes this seamless, but I don't know if U1 does this any better.

Like I said, I really like FTP, because it's very quick, no storage limits, and is a very minimalist protocol that has withstood the test of time. There are, however, very valid reasons for the success of services like Ubuntu One and Dropbox.

OwnCloud (1)

MrNaz (730548) | about 7 months ago | (#46639763)

OwnCloud. It's The Solution to this problem.

Re:FTP? (5, Funny)

Yosho (135835) | about 7 months ago | (#46639261)

Why do so many people suggest newfangled technologies like FTP? I can understand it for Windows users, but Linux users should be able to just use netcat.

Re:FTP? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639571)

I don't want to transfer files, I want to work with files stored on another machine.

There may be transfer of data, but there is not an independant copy of the file on every machine.

That people can not see the difference between api access to files packaged well, and a file copy service is very sad.

Then use ssh (1)

Viol8 (599362) | about 7 months ago | (#46639955)

Or telnet if you're desperate. Simple.

Re:It's a pity (2)

Kz (4332) | about 7 months ago | (#46639045)

unison (http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~bcpierce/unison/), BTSync (http://www.bittorrent.com/sync).

neither of these needs any "cloud" storage, just transfers efficiently between your machines. The first one is Open Source and easy to use: GUI, CLI, cron... The second one is free but closed, runs as a daemon and can be installed on several NAS boxes.

Powered-off or NATted machines (1)

tepples (727027) | about 7 months ago | (#46641233)

So how do you "transfers efficiently between your machines" if only one of said machines is turned on at once? Or if some of them are behind carrier-grade NAT and you aren't renting a VPS?

Re:It's a pity (1)

umafuckit (2980809) | about 7 months ago | (#46639103)

Try Copy. It's cheap and you get a lot of free storage for referring people.

Re:It's a pity (4, Funny)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | about 7 months ago | (#46639613)

Try Copy. It's cheap and you get a lot of free storage for referring people.

You forgot to say "Tell em umafuckit sent you!".

as in source code? svn, git, etc (4, Insightful)

raymorris (2726007) | about 7 months ago | (#46639105)

If you mean software or web pages you're developing, svn or other source control really is worth the 20 minutes or so it takes to set up the first time. Even if you're the only developer on the project. Github makes it easy to access your git repositories from anywhere if you don't have a server or dyndns.

I didn't use source control for fifteen years because it seemed like it would be a hassle. When an employee set it up, I learned it reduces hassles.

Re:It's a pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639417)

What about wuala ? They are based offshore and have compatibility for all platforms everything from linux to WP8

http://www.wuala.com/referral/JGA5NCHF3CBHK3AGCJPJ

Re:It's a pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639455)

BitTorrent Sync.

Simple, reliable, fast and free.

Re:It's a pity (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 7 months ago | (#46640057)

BitTorrent Sync.

Simple, reliable, fast and free.

And not an option because the company behind it is untrustworthy.

SpiderOak (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639483)

SpiderOak - Zero-Knowledge: https://spideroak.com/

Works on Windows, OS X, Linux (Debian, RH, and Slackware), mobile. I recently received an email from them with an offer of $125/year for unlimited space (sync and backup, automatic). That's a pretty good offer if you compare it with any other cloud provider.

You can't use it via the web browser, though. Because it's zero-knowledge they can't tell what's in your data blocks so they can only link to files that you shared publicly.

Re:It's a pity (1)

Abalamahalamatandra (639919) | about 7 months ago | (#46639691)

Consider SpiderOak Backup - they have a package repository for Ubuntu and the "Spideroak Hive" is, I believe, much like the Ubuntu One folder. I use it for backups but it looks to be nicely usable as a One replacement, especially if you're not sharing with other people a lot.

They recently sent me an email that they're offering unlimited storage for $125 a year as well, though I'm not sure how that works in practice.

And, of course, their big claim to fame is that they're zero-knowledge, so no NSA requests, etc etc.

Re:It's a pity (1)

mikael (484) | about 7 months ago | (#46639977)

Wouldn't an external USB drive be more practical? You can even make your own by simply buying a $10 case and 2.5" disk drive. Anything up to 500 Gigabytes of storage in your pocket.

Re:It's a pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46641003)

What if you lose it? It's stolen? Stops working? You don't have it when you need it? What if it's confiscated whilst traveling through an airport? If you only have one copy of your data, you don't own your data. One working copy, two backups that are sync'd. Perhaps even a fourth copy if you're paranoid.

Re:It's a pity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639997)

Git. Put those scripts in version control.

Re:It's a pity (1)

Teun (17872) | about 7 months ago | (#46640405)

It won't be available for all and it's of limited size but my provider includes a 10GB webdisk.

Very private and webdav is included in any complete Linux file manager, read-only access is via https.

Android is, among others, supported via the ES File Explorer.

For the less private stuff I use Dropbox, due to a few referrals it has grown to 3.75 GB.

like always (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638851)

Canonical is genius on wasting money , they start so many project , and neither of them actually works great . just look at unity , mir and so many other. e.g unity first written in (i think) gtk , then Canonical created nux (c++ framework), then ported to nux , and unity 2 to qml , and now they port whole unity to Qt again. something same will happen for mir . then no serious company never will look at mir seriously (like nvidia ATI )

Re:like always (1)

BreakBad (2955249) | about 7 months ago | (#46638921)

Its the new Trail-and-Error method of innovation....its an infinite loop.

Re:like always (5, Interesting)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 7 months ago | (#46638925)

they start so many project , and neither of them actually works great

This would be my last complaint about Canonical. In any industry, 90+% of ideas are going to turn out to be unworkable. It's admirable that Canonical puts resources into trying so many in the first place. Perhaps they need to learn when to cut losses sooner, but trying is the mature approach.

Now then, back to complaining about Canonical: they're releasing the code for the backend? Somebody tell me that the front end was just a webdav client and that the backend handled all the locking and synchronization parts so that this isn't a meaningless gesture for customers who are getting cut off with a whole two months' notice to re-design their workflows.

Re:like always (4, Interesting)

Beuno (740018) | about 7 months ago | (#46639195)

Now then, back to complaining about Canonical: they're releasing the code for the backend? Somebody tell me that the front end was just a webdav client and that the backend handled all the locking and synchronization parts so that this isn't a meaningless gesture for customers who are getting cut off with a whole two months' notice to re-design their workflows.

The client is not a simple webdav client, it's a pretty complex piece of code that has been open source since day one: http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~u... [launchpad.net]

The server is a complex beast. It's the other side of the syncing protocol, it has a series of workers that do all sorts of tasks on uploaded files to present them back in a scalable, usable way, it handles music purchasing and delivering, performance metrics on the system, sharing between users, and a long etc :)

I don't think users will care about open sourcing any of it, but others might be able to pick up where we left off.

Re:like always (1)

bill_mcgonigle (4333) | about 7 months ago | (#46639765)

a pretty complex piece of code that has been open source since day one

Thanks, Beuno! I didn't even realize it was multi-platform [launchpad.net] . Hopefully with the server going open source there will be new interest sparked in replacing the proprietary commercial offerings.

to pick up where we left off.

I just have to ask - Be Uno? Ubuntu One? Just a coincidence? :)

Re:like always (4, Interesting)

Grishnakh (216268) | about 7 months ago | (#46638971)

It's not much different from Google. Google has long had a "throw shit at a wall and see what sticks" approach to business. But unlike Canonical, Google already had a cash cow in the form of its search service and the attached advertising services, and then later its Gmail service, so it could afford this kind of approach.

Re:like always (3, Insightful)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | about 7 months ago | (#46639679)

Canonical is genius on wasting money , they start so many project , and neither of them actually works great . just look at unity , mir and so many other.
e.g unity first written in (i think) gtk , then Canonical created nux (c++ framework), then ported to nux , and unity 2 to qml , and now they port whole unity to Qt again.
something same will happen for mir . then no serious company never will look at mir seriously (like nvidia ATI )

Go found a company in your parents garage and sell it for half a billion dollars. Then you can "waste" money too.

Thank you Kubuntu (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638891)

Never used this service before, don't know why, maybe because it's not installed by default on kubuntu.

Another Cloud Dispersal (4, Insightful)

RichMan (8097) | about 7 months ago | (#46638899)

The non-permanence of cloud services like storage and sharing is going to be hard to solve. Sure some will last. But some will not. How do you choose the ones the will?

How will the industry handle the increasing number of people that have suffered "cloud failure". These people are going to be reluctant to use future services.

Re:Another Cloud Dispersal (5, Funny)

Voyager529 (1363959) | about 7 months ago | (#46638955)

The non-permanence of cloud services like storage and sharing is going to be hard to solve. Sure some will last. But some will not. How do you choose the ones the will?

Ask the NSA which one they use.

Re:Another Cloud Dispersal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639357)

Or even better do not pay gor none of them. Only by using internet, you are automatically added to NSA cloud without payment for your data storage. You only have to ask them to allow download yoir stuff (sarcasm)

Re:Another Cloud Dispersal (1)

Warbothong (905464) | about 7 months ago | (#46639199)

The non-permanence of cloud services like storage and sharing is going to be hard to solve. Sure some will last. But some will not. How do you choose the ones the will?

By building a "Services as a Service" layer on top, which delegates the storage to whoever's still around.

Oblig. https://xkcd.com/927/ [xkcd.com]

Re:Another Cloud Dispersal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639983)

By building a "Services as a Service" layer on top, which delegates the storage to whoever's still around.

Oblig. https://xkcd.com/927/ [xkcd.com]

I think Younited [younited.com] tries to implement something like this.

Re:Another Cloud Dispersal (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639223)

A solution you implement yourself will last as long as you make it last. 16TB ZFS server with BitTorrent Sync? Yes please.

Re:Another Cloud Dispersal (1)

Natales (182136) | about 7 months ago | (#46639443)

Completely agree. Unfortunately, it's a normal part of the growth and maturity of a new industry. We tend to forget how new all this stuff is. Adjustments, consolidations and failures will occur, but they will collectively contribute to a more robust ecosystem down the road. Like with any technology, early adopters tend to get screwed, the difference is that people were treated as "consenting" early adopters when in reality they thought they were relying on a "permanent" service.

What I do find interesting though, it's the desire from Canonical to release the source code. That can be very beneficial for all of us and new services can be spawned from there. It will be good to see what did they use underneath (Csync2 may be?) and it will be good to have alternatives to ownCloud and other services.

Re:Another Cloud Dispersal (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | about 7 months ago | (#46639475)

Roll your own.

OwnCloud (1)

MrNaz (730548) | about 7 months ago | (#46639847)

It's fast, stable, mature and provides a boatload of the functionality you get from Dropbox and Google on a server that you host yourself. Get it, use it, love it.

Ideals vs Sustainable. (3, Insightful)

jellomizer (103300) | about 7 months ago | (#46638907)

A common problem with companies that has a strong FOSS leaning, is that they come up with a lot of good ideas that will often not take off too well. And often will be discontinued shortly.
Now I applaud them for trying, however it creates a catch 22 problem.
If people do not feel comfortable that your service will last, they will not use it, your next idea will not be utilized because you have created a history of dropping products.

Re:Ideals vs Sustainable. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638985)

A common problem with companies that has a strong FOSS leaning

Because Closed Source companies NEVER release products they ditch randomly? Hell, just look at Microsoft. Silverlight, Zune are just two glaring examples that come to my mind.

Re:Ideals vs Sustainable. (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 7 months ago | (#46639141)

I still have to run Silverlight apps It just isn't in Metro mode in Windows 8, and those people who got a Zune can still use it. There are still updates too.

Hahahahahahaha (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638909)

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!! *gasp* *wheeze* *cough* Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!

other suggestions? (1)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about 7 months ago | (#46638913)

I started using sugarsync's free edition -- then they decided to better serve their customers by eliminating that option .. so i moved to Ubuntu one. And now It appears that Canonical is also wanting to better serve their customers by discontinuing the service.

My space requirements are very very slim (maybe 200MB) Would Dropbox be the go-to replacement (all machines are running windows)

Re:other suggestions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639059)

Yes. Alternatively there's SpiderOak if you want you files encrypted in the cloud.
You could also set up you own personal cloud using OwnCloud if you have a webserver or a machine which is always-on which you can use as a webserver. it would do away with the space constraints and longevity of the service. You would only have to manage uptime and connectivity of the server.

Re:other suggestions? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about 7 months ago | (#46639249)

Yes. Alternatively there's SpiderOak if you want you files encrypted in the cloud.
You could also set up you own personal cloud using OwnCloud if you have a webserver or a machine which is always-on which you can use as a webserver. it would do away with the space constraints and longevity of the service. You would only have to manage uptime and connectivity of the server.

You can rent an Amazon AWS micro instance for around $7/month (including a few GB of disk space -- additional space is $0.05/GB/month). Data transfer can kill you if you share a lot of data, inbound data to AWS is free, but outbound data is $0.12/GB so if you're send a 1GB file to 10 devices, that's $1.20 in bandwidth.

Re:other suggestions? (1)

LVSlushdat (854194) | about 7 months ago | (#46639395)

You can rent an Amazon AWS micro instance for around $7/month (including a few GB of disk space -- additional space is $0.05/GB/month). Data transfer can kill you if you share a lot of data, inbound data to AWS is free, but outbound data is $0.12/GB so if you're send a 1GB file to 10 devices, that's $1.20 in bandwidth.

I rent several 512MB Xen-based Linux virtual servers that I pay $28.50/semi-annually for. On month-to-month, they're $5/mo.. They come with 512mb of ram, 1GB of swap, 30GB of diskspace, and 1TB of transfer/month.. I've only had one minor issue with them, where somehow, the vps allocated_ram configuration on one of my slices got set to 128mb vs 512mb.. A quick support ticket to them got the problem fixed. I'd say that was quite a bit cheaper than AWS.. I don't have any ties with the company, just a happy customer.. Google "Virpus networks"...

Re:other suggestions? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46640413)

200 MB? You can get flash drives in your cereal with larger capacities than that.

Re:other suggestions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639085)

I started using sugarsync's free edition -- then they decided to better serve their customers by eliminating that option .. so i moved to Ubuntu one. And now It appears that Canonical is also wanting to better serve their customers by discontinuing the service.

My space requirements are very very slim (maybe 200MB) Would Dropbox be the go-to replacement (all machines are running windows)

Dropbox works fine on Windows / Linux and Mac.

Re:other suggestions? (3, Interesting)

vladilinsky (1071536) | about 7 months ago | (#46639227)

I am always on the lookout for cloud storage my current list from best to worst with their respective pros and cons are (*Based on what I have seen & most of my computers run linux so its a major part of my list)

1. Copy.com - Most free storage 15 gb, works with every environment, Integrates acceptably with linux, Most generous with new free space for referrals (+5 gb for both parties). I have not yet witnessed how it handles conflicting copies of a file. On that note If anyone wants a copy account we both get an extra 5 gigs if you follow my referral link https://copy.com?r=9frCDJ [copy.com]
2. Dropbox - Great handling of conflicting copies, works with every environment, great linux integration, lowest storage space and lowest storage space per referral. Great handling of conflicted copies.
3. Spideroak - Great linux integration, great encryption, No online viewing of files (due to the encryption) great linux integration 4. Box - great free space, none existent linux integration, no conflict checking/ history for free version. It ate many of my important school files because of this. 5. There are also Google drive and microsoft Onedrive but I have no experience with them.

To sum up, right now My favorite is copy.com due to copious amounts for free space and Linux intigration. Hope that helps

Re:other suggestions? (2)

master_kaos (1027308) | about 7 months ago | (#46639485)

I don't know about "Great linux integration" for dropbox, At work we have the business version working on our ubuntu fileserver and we are trying to sync 300k files. (eventually we want to replace this with a VPN but can't at the moment). Linux version crashes at least once a week, we even tried it on another ubuntu box and same issue. We reinstalled our fileserver with windows 7 and it has now been working solid for over a month with no crashes.

Re:other suggestions? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 7 months ago | (#46640083)

maybe switch to something else than ubuntu?

and uh, dropbox and 300k files is going to be shitty no matter what and that really sounds like there's no actual desktop or mobile users syncing to that dropbox which would be the whole point of using dropbox.

Re:other suggestions? (3, Informative)

paraax (126484) | about 7 months ago | (#46640203)

Spideroak allows online viewing via web interface. Anytime you use the web interface, however, you give up the zero knowledge portion as they need your password to decrypt the files. Also there is a shared folder feature that allows you to create a separate share password to give out to other people for a folder. Presumably use of this feature also gives up on the zero-knowledge at least for that folder.

Re:other suggestions? (1)

squiggleslash (241428) | about 7 months ago | (#46639287)

Google Drive?

I know you said Windows, but for those not using it (like the majority of Ubuntu One users one presumes...) there's actually a few FUSE drivers out there that can make your Google Drive part of your regular file system (these started being developed back in the Google Docs days), which is nice.

Re:other suggestions? (1)

erlegreer (1994842) | about 7 months ago | (#46639297)

I highly recommend Dropbox. It has clients for Win, Linux, iOS, Android, BlackBerry OS, and others, including direct web access. I think you start with a free 2GB, but you can get a few GB more for free by linking your various devices and inviting friends. I think my total is around 8GB currently.

It seems to work flawlessly. Any time you make changes or add files, the folder icon changes to a folder sync icon, letting you know which folders are still syncing. I have my wife using her own Dropbox for her contract work, and my teens have their own for their homework, music, etc.

Re:other suggestions? (1)

master_kaos (1027308) | about 7 months ago | (#46639425)

I also love dropbox but the space they give you is not enough unless you are willing to pay. I use copy.com which has similar features to dropbox, with way more space. I would use dropbox in a second over copy if they had same amount (or even close to the same amount) of space for free, but since they dont ill stick to copy.

Re:other suggestions? (1)

safetyinnumbers (1770570) | about 7 months ago | (#46639929)

And it has versioning via the website. You can see all recent activity, revert to old versions and undo deletions.

Re:other suggestions? (1)

Teun (17872) | about 7 months ago | (#46641183)

Sounds like you could do with a USB thumb drive...

2nd April (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638915)

Are they posting fools on 2nd April? No, i think they use Ubuntu One to update they're blog, they posted that thing yesterday

Re:2nd April (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638957)

Isn't the real April Fools Joke that anyone would use a Canonical product?

Dust, Bites, One, Another (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638945)

When you "sell" your labor for free these things happen. Hurts. See, Truth.

Best Ubuntu feature ever!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638995)

Now at last, a reason to rediscover Ubuntu, all over again...

Yikes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46638997)

[quote]The current services will be unavailable from 1 June 2014; user content will remain available for download until 31 July, at which time it will be deleted.[/quote]

Yikes! There will definitely be people who lose data because of such a short time scale between announcement and deletion. They should keep it up for at least a year from the cancellation of service.

Linux fails it yet again! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639001)

You little fanboys make me laugh. I thought Linux was suppose to be on every desktop by now and MS was suppose to be selling pencils on the street corners just to eat? What happened, big shots? Oh, that's right... you move the goal posts and now you claim everything is great because of Android.
 
LOLZzzzz!!!! FAIL!!!!!

Re:Linux fails it yet again! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639235)

You know that Linux easily represents at least 10% of the total install market in the US today? Don't you? The numbers from sales are skewed because of the M$Tax but the truth of the matter is that Linux has a larger home user number than Windows 8 or OSX.

Re:Linux fails it yet again! (0)

qbast (1265706) | about 7 months ago | (#46639961)

Nurse! Patient calling himself 'anonymous coward' has complete break from reality again.

Re:Linux fails it yet again! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46640081)

How much does M$ pay you to come to Slashdot?

One of this last good things Ubuntu (4, Insightful)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 7 months ago | (#46639023)

Pardon this post as it is heavy on opinion. If you think it's so far off the mark you want to mod me down, it would be far more productive to reply.

Ubuntu One was a pretty big deal and one of the last good things attached to Canonical Ubuntu's name (IMHO). Hard times at Canonical perhaps? Canonical has always struck me as a company that won't be around forever, if even a few scant more years. They are always either too busy chasing unrealistic goals in the hopes of being elevated to the levels of the real major players in tech, or are busy fighting against popular trends and pushing back against the overall direction of Linux and Open Source.

The death of Canonical is a shake up the Linux development community needs for both perspective and spurring continued innovation in Linux and Linux distributions.

Re:One of this last good things Ubuntu (1)

sqorbit (3387991) | about 7 months ago | (#46639663)

I don't believe Ubuntu One was a major driving factor when people think of Ubuntu's name. It has it's fans, some who are very passionate about it and I don't think many of those fans would say that Ubuntu One is one of the major reasons they are fans. If you were a fan of Ubuntu before they close down Ubuntu One I don't think it will severely impact your opinion of their distro.

good. always hated it being default (1)

doas777 (1138627) | about 7 months ago | (#46639031)

It always just seemed like the first step toward them becoming a really crappy apple store.

Now if they just ditch unity and mir and their advertising in the dash, I can go back to using ubuntu.

Re:good. always hated it being default (1)

LVSlushdat (854194) | about 7 months ago | (#46639499)

Now if they just ditch unity and mir and their advertising in the dash, I can go back to using ubuntu.

Why bother? Debian itself or the Mint-Debian edition will work just as well, withOUT the moronic Canonical touch that Ubuntu seems to have... I used to tout Ubuntu to all my friends, many of whom were on Windows.. Since Canonical/Ubuntu has started this slide to insanity, I've switched my allegiance over to Debian, for those who are fairly Linux-knowledgable, and Mint-Debian Edition, for Linux noobs..

Make your own "cloud" with Bittorrent Sync... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639163)

I use BitTorrent Sync to syncronize a couple of file shares between 2 workstations (Ubuntu+Win7), 1 laptop (Win7), and a ubuntu-12.04 server. I also use this to syncronize backup files between a production server and a backup server. Personally I've been able to retire my Dropbox account and a Ubuntu One account with this utility. This set-up has run well for almost 1-year. It does take a little more technical knowledge to set this up but I think it's well worth the effort.

Good (0)

drolli (522659) | about 7 months ago | (#46639309)

The service sucked from the beginning and if i want to have my mainly OS as a platform to get cloud services shuffled up my ass then i buy apple, android, or chrome OS.

Who regularly offers 25 to 50GB for free? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46639579)

Of the storage sites I know, only two is in the range of 25-50GB.

4Shared 15GB
Amazon Cloud 5GB
AT&T Locker 50GB
Box 10GB
Copy 15GB
Dropbox 2GB
ElephantDrive 2GB
Google Drive 15GB
iCloud 5GB
Mega 50GB
Mozy 2GB
OneDrive 7GB

Kim Dotcom seems to treat Mega as a hobby, so I don't trust it.

Aw, crap. (1)

tpstigers (1075021) | about 7 months ago | (#46639609)

I used it once.

Woz was right (2)

Gothmolly (148874) | about 7 months ago | (#46639777)

Woz spoke last year about this - how you should have your data, on your device, in your hand.

Helpful Command to Remove Ubuntu One (1)

mholve (1101) | about 7 months ago | (#46639973)

Remove all the Ubuntu One stuff installed by default:

apt-get remove deja-dup-backend-ubuntuone python-ubuntuone-client python-ubuntuone-control-panel python-ubuntuone-storageprotocol rhythmbox-ubuntuone ubuntuone-client ubuntuone-client-data ubuntuone-control-panel ubuntuone-control-panel-qt

And for good measure:

apt-get remove unity-scope-musicstores

Never used it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46640109)

I never used it. I'm not comfortable with anything 'in the cloud' so it doesn't matter whether their service was competing with something else or not, I just was not interested. So I won't miss it. I did buy a NAS box in the last 6 months (and I'd been looking at buying one for a long time), and it saved my hide just a month ago when a drive (500GB, 82% full) failed with (initially) 17 bad blocks, then 120 bad blocks the next day (when I ran ddrescue on it), and 643 bad blocks after finishing ddrescue. After that, I couldn't even format the thing. But the NAS was very useful.

Cloud storage needs to be RAIDed (3, Interesting)

savuporo (658486) | about 7 months ago | (#46640379)

To actually rest at ease in regards to my stored data, i want a solution that does redundant distribution of my data across 2 or more storage solutions - with something super cheap and slow like Amazon Glacier in the mix , with more than one paid service, and a physical backup of my own hard disks hooked to a local NAS box as well.
And i want an option for self-hosting the front-end too.

So if something like Ubuntu pulls the plug, gets too expensive, fucks up their client, i dont have to worry about migrating my data or changing my workflows.

From the cloud to the crowd (1)

Art3x (973401) | about 7 months ago | (#46641173)

I'm curious, or maybe just ignorant, why the open source community does not already have a mature, widespread file storage application that is peer to peer, like BitTorrent Sync [bittorrent.com] . Maybe because peer to peer is so much harder than client-server. But I would have thought it would be further along by now, given our:

- technical savvy
- awareness of the importance of good back-ups
- distrust of corporations and governments

If we had a free file back-up service that was standard for Linux (or if there were two or three, for the sake of competition, but that at least each distro had one that it picked as its standard), then I think it would help Linux catch on as well as improve the sense of community: I'm helping host some of your data, you're hosting some of mine --- even though I have no idea what or whose it is because I have just a bunch of encrypted shards.

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