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Earth's Constant Hum Explained

CowboyNeal posted more than 7 years ago | from the global-tinnitus dept.

News 336

MattSparkes writes "It has been known for some time that there is a constant hum that emanates from the Earth, which can be heard near 10 millihertz on a seismometer. The problem was that nobody knew what caused it. It has now been shown that it is caused by waves on the bottom of the sea, and more specifically 'by the combination of two waves of the same frequency travelling in opposite directions.'"

cancel ×

336 comments

I shall be the first to say (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036738)

Ohm-mani-padme-hum

not frist psot (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036750)

i fail it

Constant Hum (5, Funny)

MattSparkes (950531) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036764)

When I'm in a quiet room I can often hear a quiet hum. It started after I went to an Arctic Monkeys concert...

Ohmmm (1, Funny)

mdsolar (1045926) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036794)

The sound of the Earth meditating upon its naval should be a comfort to all of us.
--
Spelling, its only fun it you can mess with it.

Re:Constant Hum (5, Funny)

Fist! Of! Death! (1038822) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036846)

Don't worry, they say it changes when the sun goes down...

Re:Constant Hum (3, Funny)

MattSparkes (950531) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036900)

Yeah, it gets louder unfortunately. Damn monkeys.

Re:Constant Hum (2, Funny)

solevita (967690) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036938)

First post, on a story you submitted? You're all over this one! I've got a strange feeling that this day will forever be known as Matt Sparkes day.

Re:Constant Hum (2, Funny)

MattSparkes (950531) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036944)

And it shall be a national holiday, and festive donuts will be consumed.

Re:Constant Hum (1)

117 (1013655) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037374)

Yeah, that figures, it's from all the Radio1-listening/Q Magazine-reading sheep at the gig humming along to the bland-but-hummable music churned out from the last year's crop of drivel-producing bands like The View, The Automatic, The Killers, The Feeling etc - in fact the only thing that seperates Arctic Monkeys is that their name doesn't begin with 'The'....

So that's what causes it (5, Funny)

niconorsk (787297) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036782)

I've always just assumed it was the Earth purring.

Re:So that's what causes it (1)

kars (100858) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036812)

I can just -feel- a new picture coming;

"I has a hum."

Re:So that's what causes it (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037362)

Well that begs the question of who is petting it.

please (5, Funny)

baldass_newbie (136609) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036796)

For the love of God, make it stop!

constant hum (0, Offtopic)

ajs318 (655362) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036808)

I had a constant 50Hz hum emanating from my loudspeakers once. Swapped the brown and blue wires going to the turntable and that cured it. Reckon somebody at the factory didn't understand that the live wire should be on the INSIDE of a motor stator or transformer whenever there is sensitive electronic equipment nearby. Of course, on the Continent, they could just reverse the plug in the socket with the same effect. What's worse is I've known someone wire a high-impedance (50K ohm) mic to a preamp with about five metres of unshielded cable, running in a bundle with mains cables, and not a hint of a hum. Go figure.

Re:constant hum (5, Funny)

solevita (967690) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036912)

Sorry, but the breakthrough research that explained how some guy's hifi hummed was last week; you probably had a ground loop or something. But this week we're talking about the Earth; it's like your hifi, but more people care.

You Fail It! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037326)

Read her post again, it wasn't a ground loop -- it was the motor. The live lead was erroneously connected to the outside of the windings. She swapped over the connections so the live was on the inside and the neutral was on the outside, thus shielding it.

Ohhhh yes :) (4, Funny)

kahei (466208) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037428)


You SO win the prize for 'AC reply that is most obviously by the original poster, ever' :) I especially love the way you just telepathically know that the original poster was a 'she'.

A winner is you!

Re:constant hum (2, Funny)

Prune (557140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036980)

That's strange, I only get a 60 Hz hum... I wonder what could possibly cause the difference... :P

Re:constant hum (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037212)

60 Hz 50, 100 and 120 Hzare noise due to power lines

Things like EKG's and EEG's are very sensitive and contain filters to remove these frequencies

To receive this signal we must filter out other unwanted signals , This is done in seismometers, Taking the concept further we simply center the seismometers filter on 10e-3 Hz and we now have a graphical , output of this wave

Re:constant hum (1)

Prune (557140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037256)

For crying out loud, I even put an emoticon in the post... of course I was joking. He's in Europe, I'm in North America. 50 Hz vs 60 Hz mains.

Re:constant hum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037130)

If you can hear it, the signal is strong . A detector on the ground (strain gauge or microphone plved on the ground connected to a bandpass filter centered on it should allow you to see / isolates this signal on an oscilloscope.
The bandpass filter necessary to remove other unwanted mechanical vibrations
  It would be interesting to up convert it to an audio frequency thus making it audible

Re:constant hum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037290)

10e-3 HZ is not audible.
  Human hearing begins at 20 Hz , so what is heard from the ground is a harmonic response of this signal
THat being said whaqt is audible can vary from place to place is steps of .01 Hz (10e-3 Hz)
for example if the hum is audible at 30 Hz this is the 3000 th harmonic of this earth signal
the fundamental signal .01 Hz can only be seen .
  Such as on a chart recored or 0silloscope .01 Hz cannot be heard by people.
this signal can be up converted into the human hearing range by simple elevtonc mixing process,
 

Re:constant hum (1)

thegnu (557446) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037432)

Reckon somebody at the factory didn't understand that the live wire should be on the INSIDE of a motor stator or transformer whenever there is sensitive electronic equipment nearby

That's the problem with products manufactured in 3rd-world sweatshops: You should never trust a boy to do a man's job.

*ducks*

Alternate explanation (1)

mattr (78516) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036810)

That, or it is the power plant of an alien base hidden in the hollow shelf off the Vancouver coast. Or both.

Re:Alternate explanation (5, Funny)

Yvanhoe (564877) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036942)

They didn't say what causes the waves !
Everybody knows this is Great Cthulhu snoring in his sleep
Now please lose 2D6 sanity points

MOD PARENT UP! (-1, Offtopic)

Andre_PC (893877) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037316)

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn!

Re:Alternate explanation (2, Interesting)

twistedsymphony (956982) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037398)

They didn't say what causes the waves !
What did cause the waves?, How do we know that the waves weren't caused by the hum?

Re:Alternate explanation (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037370)

Maybe the Earth just doesn't know the words.

10 millihertz (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036816)

= 100 seconds per cycle?

Re:10 millihertz (5, Informative)

FormOfActionBanana (966779) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036862)

Actually, I think it works out to about 36 waves per hour.

10 milliHertz = 10 * 1/1000 waves per second
=> 0.01 waves per second
* 60 => 0.6 waves per minute
* 60 => 36 waves per hour

You're correct (1)

FormOfActionBanana (966779) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036876)

Oh, which i should say is just another way of stating your correct calculation!

I have a degree in Mathematics... one would hope I had a solid grasp of fractions by now. But no....

Well, obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037234)

...you should have become an accountant.

divide by 2 (1)

mdsolar (1045926) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036958)

But the hum is a frequency doubling, the original waves would pass a fixed point at 18 per hour.
--
Wave mechanics surf.

Re:10 millihertz (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037116)

Tomato, potato. 36 waves per hour is one wave per 100 seconds, or one cycle per hundred seconds or 100 seconds per cycle...

OR (1)

missing000 (602285) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037402)

100 cycles per 10000 seconds, what about that?

Damn (5, Funny)

sharp-bang (311928) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036818)

So all this time I guess I should have put the tinfoil in my shoes.

Maybe it's just happy? (5, Funny)

crosbie (446285) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036824)

...as Douglas Adams might have said.

Re:Maybe it's just happy? (2, Funny)

laejoh (648921) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036914)

or maybe it [wikipedia.org] 's just happy ;)

Re:Maybe it's just happy? (5, Funny)

Veetox (931340) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036990)

You may be closer to the truth than you know: $10 (Yeah, I know I'm cheap...) says that researchers will later find out that human activity is impeding the waves and if that impediment continues, it will ruin biological interactions all over the planet... Yeah, you know whats going to happen: monkeys falling out of trees, birds migrating the wrong way, and lesbian women becoming sexually attracted to nerds. Also, hell freezing over.

who you gonna call? (1)

Hebbinator (1001954) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037262)

Ray: What he means is Old Testament, Mr. Mayor, real wrath-of-God type stuff.
Venkman: Exactly.
Ray: Fire and brimstone coming down from the skies, rivers and seas boiling.
Egon: Forty years of darkness. Earthquakes, volcanoes-
Winston: The dead rising from the grave-
Venkman: Human sacrifice, DOGS and CATS living together.. Mass Hysteria!

Re:Maybe it's just happy? (0, Offtopic)

Prune (557140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036998)

Mod parents down for promoting disinformation. Cats don't purr when they're happy. Often cats will purr even when they are even severely injured. Purring actually is an indication they are feeling sociable and welcome attention. There is also some suggestion that cats use it as a healing mechanism, similar to vibration physiotherapy which actually uses similar frequencies.

Re:Maybe it's just happy? (2, Insightful)

LMacG (118321) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037286)

Who said anything about cats?

Re:Maybe it's just happy? (2, Insightful)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037304)

Amazingly enough, not all cats are the same. My late tabby only purred when he was happy. Never once did I hear/feel him purr before he received the attention he wanted.

On the other hand, my current cat is the opposite. Purring seems to have nothing to do with being happy. She will frequently walk up to me and just start purring, and generally stops once I start petting her.

So it's not really disinformation, it's partial information. Just like yours.

Wow (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036836)

All this time, I just assumed it was because it couldn't remember the words.

Re:Wow (1)

kmx69 (935085) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036968)

What words would those be? stop defecating in my yard? don't piss on my lawn? stop drilling holes in me?

Re:Wow (1)

BrokenHalo (565198) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036976)

Heh - best post of the week, and you had to do it anonymously...

Why? (2, Interesting)

khristian (1009227) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036838)

I think these people "researching" it have too free time in their hands...

(...)This creates a standing wave that "goes thump, thump, thump on(...)
Sound more like a kid that's happy for having found out how something works. Well, if that keeps 'em happy, they should go for it ^^

Re:Why? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037102)

These are seismologists - the same people who try to predict earthquakes. Any noise the earth makes may have something to do with earthquakes and thus is worth study.

Did ancient greeks know about this? (5, Interesting)

torrija (993870) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036840)

I think this is a concept related to Pythagoras' Musica Universalis http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musica_universalis [wikipedia.org] . An inaudible sound on all celestial bodies.

Re:Did ancient greeks know about this? (2, Insightful)

kestasjk (933987) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037156)

No, Pythagoras didn't have a seismometer capable of detecting 10 millihertz..

Hmmmmmmmm (4, Insightful)

dcw3 (649211) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036850)

Ok, so the waves are making the sound. Now tell us what causes the waves. I didn't notice a source in TFA.

Re:Hmmmmmmmm (5, Funny)

FormOfActionBanana (966779) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036896)

The Thetans?

But wait! (5, Interesting)

camperdave (969942) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036952)

...the waves are making the sound.

Wait a minute. How do we know that it's the waves that are causing the hum, and not the other way around? Perhaps the planet is still ringing from meteor impacts, and the hum is just the resonant frequency. The deep ocean waves may be just a side effect.

Re:But wait! (1)

radtea (464814) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037242)

How do we know that it's the waves that are causing the hum, and not the other way around? Perhaps the planet is still ringing from meteor impacts, and the hum is just the resonant frequency.

Damping.

Note to mods: you misspelled "funny".

Re:But wait! (1)

MindKata (957167) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037340)

The article doesn't mention the hum is a momentary event, it seems to imply this is a commonly occurring 10 millihertz hum? ... So maybe the wave action is introducing random noise and part of that noise could then be hitting possibly the resonate frequency of some part of the Earth?!

But could it be the resonate frequency of the whole earth? ... or the resonate frequency of just the Oceans? ... or even the resonate frequency of the rock part of the earth?. (Or even possibly the resonate frequency of the liquid outer core?!)

It would be fascinating to know what the resonate frequency of the whole earth could be?. (I promise not to use it to build a Dooms Day machine ;)

Re:But wait! (2, Insightful)

rucs_hack (784150) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037346)

given the fact that most natural systems exist in some kind of homeostatic relationship with other systems, its likely that the cause is rather complex. I wouldn't have a clue where to start.

That's what I love about science though, there's yet another thing to explain. I wonder what it will reveal?

Interesting, but wrong (4, Funny)

Dr. Eggman (932300) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036864)

Your article was very interesting, but it's wrong. I have a better idea. You see, the center of the earth is full of bees. They make the earth hum and the turtle stack keeps turning to find out what's buzzing. You see? Mine's a much better explaination: explains the humming and the rotation of the Earth!

Re:Interesting, but wrong (0)

Chtulhu (1033546) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036928)

No, no, that's wrong. God makes the sound. MMMkay?

Re:Interesting, but wrong (2, Informative)

Prune (557140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037012)

This would have been funny except you seem to lack reading comprehension. The article said ten MILLIhertz! That's a single beat every hundred seconds. Bees' buzzing is about three orders of magnitude higher in frequency.

Re:Interesting, but wrong (1)

nyctopterus (717502) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037064)

That would have been interesting except you, sir, are a sad little wanking man.

Re:Interesting, but wrong (1)

Prune (557140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037288)

Send me an email, identifying yourself. Write to muthaga@msn.com I'll tell you my address and agree for you to visit me and I'll show you my girlfriends, then you'll see whether I need 'wanking'.

Re:Interesting, but wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037360)

Gee, is that why i've been getting all these nekked pictures in my inbox? All this time I thought it was porn adverts... but i guess its been defensive little asshats out to prove their masculinity. Take a joke. And take it over there, and dont bother anyone.

Re:Interesting, but wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037408)

Asshats? Thats a funny one - you wear an ass on your head as a hat? Does that mean.. you have your head up an ass? :)

Re:Interesting, but wrong (1)

Prune (557140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037426)

LOL

Re:Interesting, but wrong (1)

Don_dumb (927108) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037178)

Yeah, the frequency is the flaw in his comment about bees in the centre of the Earth. You lack humour comprehension.

Re:Interesting, but wrong (1)

Prune (557140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037268)

Yes, it is. See, the joke is made by that ludicrous proposition. Any unintentional errors detract from it.

Re:Interesting, but wrong (1)

johnny cashed (590023) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037224)

Damn nerds. Oh, wait, this is /.

Re:Interesting, but wrong (4, Funny)

HalfFlat (121672) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037240)

I don't think you understand. They are very large bees.

Re:Interesting, but wrong (3, Funny)

Salsaman (141471) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037266)

Exactly. In the same way that the Earth sits on the back of a *giant* turtle. It would be ridiculous to think that the Earth rested on the back of a normal turtle - why, a normal sized turtle would get crushed by the weight !

IT'S BEES (1)

circletimessquare (444983) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037406)

ALL THE WAY DOWN

Whales (5, Funny)

Fist! Of! Death! (1038822) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036874)

It is probably driving the whales crazy. They think it's the Voices...

Re:Whales (2, Insightful)

Prune (557140) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037022)

This would have been funny, except the ten MILLIhertz frequency (one beat per hundred seconds) is a couple of orders of magnitude lower than what whales can hear.

It stopped the other day (5, Funny)

Centurix (249778) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036882)

When I shutdown my PC. Turns out the bearing was on its way out.

take it stewie (0, Offtopic)

TheSmokingMan666 (659521) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036902)

there's some waves at the bottom of the sea there's some waves at the bottom of the sea oh there's some waves, there's some waves there's some waves at the bottom of the sea

Energy (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036926)

is it a harnessable energy source?

I'm guessing it may be to week/dispersed. But would be nice to know if it could be focussed suficiently.

hertzs (4, Informative)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036960)

10 milliHz is a beat every 100 seconds. Must be really tricky to detect. I wonder how far below that frequency the sensitivities of seismometers go.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seismometer#Modern_re cording [wikipedia.org] mentiones only down to 1Hz. Need to see original article in Nature from work.

Re:hertzs (stacking) (2, Insightful)

Reverse Gear (891207) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037232)

Well many seismometers are constantly on and have very long periods of this noise recorded.
So with enough stacking you can pretty much detect as low frequencies as you want if only the amplitude is strong enough to be detected by the seismometers, so my guess is that the limiting factor is not the 1 Hz, but lies in how small amplitudes these seismometers detect.

These suggested waves would hold quite an amount of energy so it does make sense that they are able to detect these to me.

Aha! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18036978)

So that's the noise that has been driving me up the wall.

Balrog (5, Funny)

tore (26817) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036988)

I always thought it was the Balrog humming.

Come one it is the intelligent shaking. (4, Funny)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 7 years ago | (#18036996)

These atheistic God-denying scientists attribute the constant hum detected by the seismometers to some random wave action at the ocean floors. But they ignore the fact that it violates the second law of thermodynamics (whatever it is). The real cause for the hum is the intelligent shaking by the Shaker. We demand equal time in all classrooms and seminars and conferences, wherever these surfologists congregate to rebut their theory (not fact) with our scientifically formulated real sceintific fact that intelligent shaking is the fundamental cause for all the hum on earth.

Re:Come one it is the intelligent shaking. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037070)

There needs to be a new mod option: +1, Sad but True...

Global-scale flood tectonic cataclysm ring down. (1)

truckaxle (883149) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037122)

Actually the hum is the planetary ring down of the violent shaking the earth received after the continents rapidly moved to their present locations due to a global-scale flood tectonic cataclysm. BTW I predict that the magnitude of this hum is exponentially decaying just like the speed of light and earth magnetic field.

Re:Come one it is the intelligent shaking. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037280)

Actually, the scientists HYPOTHESIZE that the hum is caused by opposing wave forces on the ocean floor, but they don't know for sure. Yet, because the church of science believes it to be true, that belief clearly trumps your shaking belief. I mean, we're as certain about this as what causes the process of evolution, and how such diverse species such as the Ampulex compressa wasp were formed by random processes in the universe.

The Shaker is all in your mind. How do we know this? Because we don't believe it, and WE are better than you and your primitive notion of the universe. Because we came up with our ideas now, and your ideas are 1000's of years old, that automatically makes our ideas more palpable and likely.

Tell your Shaker to pass the salt, so we can pour it on the wounds our grand hypothesis has undoubtedly etched into your soul. And tell Janeway to stick that up her prime directive, we need to interfere with your belief system. Why? Because it really irks us when you don't believe what we believe, because WE KNOW WE ARE RIGHT!

Re:Come one it is the intelligent shaking. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037400)

I guess those mod points stating that is is off topic are right. I mean, a sarcastic reply to a sarcastic post about a Shaker God is really off topic.

Here's a clue for the next mod to read this: Disagreeing with an opinion doesn't make it off topic. Instead, your inaccurate use of mod points shows your own inadequate feelings toward your beliefs.

Must you really suppress the opinion of others just to insure the sanctity of your frail opinion? Censorship is for the weak, and that mod runs warm yellow down his leg every time he reads something he disagrees with.

Quick! Someone patent/copyright/trademark it! (4, Funny)

fmobus (831767) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037018)

If this humming is omnipresent, it means that every music is "sampling" it without authorization. We then sue RIAA out of existence for unlicensed sampling.
PROFIT!

Easy to explain (3, Funny)

hey! (33014) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037060)

Nobody's figured out how to ground the dang thing.

Which sea? (1)

3seas (184403) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037068)

If I know which one maybe I can tune it to make music and really stump the scientist.
(re: my user handle)

Throbbing (2, Insightful)

andrewuwe (997499) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037194)

10 millihertz sounds more like a throb than a hum to me, perhaps even a chug.

I have an idea (5, Interesting)

LaughingCoder (914424) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037206)

Maybe we could build a clock that used this hum as some sort of synchronization. Then every clock on the planet could be synchronized, since this signal is presumably detectable everywhere.

OK, I didn't say it was a *good* idea :-)

Peace At Last (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037264)

Now if only they could make the voices stop as well.

Which one? (0, Flamebait)

JPMaximilian (948958) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037276)

Does this fall under news for nerds or stuff that matters? I'm guessing it isn't the latter.

Re:Which one? (0, Flamebait)

fredrated (639554) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037394)

Humans are deeply curious, and the desire to know is independent of the knowledges applicability. Are you a cyborg?

is 10 Millihertz B Flat? (1)

scherbi (21342) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037284)

'cause apparently, B Flat is 'universal':
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?story Id=7442915 [npr.org]

Re:is 10 Millihertz B Flat? (1)

mdsolar (1045926) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037412)

B Flat is about 466 Hz so that is 4.66e4 higher, 2e15=3.3e4 and 2e16=6.6e4 so it is probably a bit off pitch for B Flat.

Sorry, folks. (1)

qwertphobia (825473) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037298)

That was just the bass on my kickin' car stereo. I turned it down, so it shouldn't be a problem. Those nine-foot quartz drivers are tite!

But seriously, how much power would it take to put such a vibration into the air, and how far would it travel? I'm just picturing the hair on my head blowing this way and that way with the changes in sound pressue.

Why does the earth hum? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#18037320)

Maybe it just doesn't know the lyrics.

OK, next question... (1)

advocate_one (662832) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037354)

what's driving the very low frequency waves then??? Atmospheric turbulence??? Which if so, would mean that the indirect cause of the "hum" IS atmospheric turbulence...

Re:OK, next question... (1)

fredrated (639554) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037430)

In the article they say the energy is comming from the coasts of the world, so it is probably from the pounding of waves on the shore, in essence transfering the energy of atmospheric turbulence into the oceans.

I guess I was just misinformed. (1)

Harlow_B_Ashur (35202) | more than 7 years ago | (#18037440)

I thought Zappa had explained this one years ago.
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  • ecode

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<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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