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The Death of the Music CD

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the ding-dong-the-witch-is-dead dept.

Music 483

Rick Zeman writes "According to the Washington Post, the next new music format will be...no format. From the article: 'What the consumer would buy is a data file, and you could create whatever you need. If you want to make an MP3, you make an MP3. If you want a DVD-Audio surround disc, you make that.'"

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Obviously (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660711)

You get the highest quality so you can always make lesser copies.

Sound's Great... (5, Interesting)

yotto (590067) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660720)

...Until they DRM it every way but sideways.

Re:Sound's Great... (0, Redundant)

yotto (590067) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660750)

I swear, I know the proper use of an apostrophe.

Really.

Re:Sound's Great... (5, Insightful)

LourensV (856614) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660986)

Actually, that may not be so bad. The reason that policy issues like extending copyright or introducing DMCA/EUCD-like laws are so hard to decide in 'our' favour is that nobody cares. And the reason for that is that these laws aren't enforced all that much.

If Microsoft really cracked down on Windows piracy, many more people would consider an alternative. GNU/Linux can compete with Windows on price and freedom to help your neighbour, but only if people actually are forced to pay for Windows, and kept from sharing proprietary software.

Indie music that is sold on reasonable terms (unencumbered CDs or DVDs, non-DRMmed Ogg Vorbis or MP3) or distributed under a Creative Commons licence that allows redistribution can compete with RIAA music on ease of use (i.e. pay once, listen anywhere), but only if the RIAA's restrictions are enforced.

I say let them DRM the hell out of everything. Hundreds of millions of people and the whole open counterculture that's come into being in the last decade versus the powerful media conglomerates. I think we'll win.

Re:Sound's Great... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11661001)

I agree, sound is great

Re:Sound's Great... (1)

FusionDragon2099 (799857) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661039)

And then we'll copy it sideways.

IOP (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660722)

Newsflash!

Not everyone in the world is a nerd.

Keep things simple. Buying CDs are simple. Hence, people will buy CDs.

Re:IOP (4, Insightful)

TekMonkey (649444) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660801)

Millions of people download music and movie files from P2P networks. They know how to play an mp3, and how to burn it to a CD; I'm sure they will be able to figure out how to do this too.

Re:IOP (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660815)

No they'll just go on stealing like the bastards they are.

mp3s are the future! (0)

MarkByers (770551) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661015)

Keep things simple. Buying mp3s is simple. Hence, people will buy mp3s.

Re:IOP (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11661051)

Enough with this nerd bullshit. I don't know if the Americans are that stupid and being able to play an mp3 is considered something so sophisticated, but in other parts of the world it's a thing every normal person can do, nothing "nerdy" here.

Not gonna happen (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660726)

Never in a million years. The music industry wants to give us LESS and charge us MORE. This scheme would mean them giving us MORE and charging us... well, who cares. They're not going to give us more.

I do that already. (-1, Redundant)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660731)

It's called the iTunes Music Store.

No..format? (5, Funny)

NorthWoodsman (606357) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660740)

So in other words, the format is WAV.

Re:No..format? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660767)

or better yet... AIFF

Re:No..format? (2, Interesting)

dotwaffle (610149) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660771)

But that uses digital sampling, forcing you to use 44.1kHz or whatever they use these days... I'd prefer a pristine analogue copy that I could convert myself...

Of course, that'd be ridiculously expensive and stoopid. A losslessly compressed non-DRM'd RAW/WAV file suits me...

Re:No..format? (2, Interesting)

lxrhee (841652) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660793)

so is this goodbye to analog? photography is saying goodbye too, but the 'artists' prefer analog there.. musicians don't seem to care

So the new audio format will be... (1)

jb.hl.com (782137) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660744)

WAV files?

Re:So the new audio format will be... (1)

Leroy_Brown242 (683141) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660786)

Super high tech, yo.

Re:So the new audio format will be... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11661060)

More likely some other loss-less compression.

Apple has already shown off transcode and transfer tech in the iPod Shuffle. If you use say Apple Losses to rip your CDs. When it comes time to transfer it to the iPod Shuffle, iTunes will on the fly, transcode into a compact lossy (lossly?) format. You can already do the same when you burn CD's. Given another 5-10 years of bandwidth growth, Apple may start offering lossless downloads one day.

No format (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660746)

How is this different from the flexibility of an mp3?

Re:No format (5, Informative)

Ingolfke (515826) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660945)

MP3s lose information due to their compressions scheme. So if you converted from and MP3 to OGG to WMA you'd end up with file missing all of the information from each round of compression. Using a lossless encoding format, like FLAC or WMA Lossles, would allow you to copy to whichever media format you prefer.

Already been done... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660747)

http://www.bnlmusic.com/ - barenaked ladies use FLAC (iirc)

I doubt it (3, Informative)

magefile (776388) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660749)

I mean, at first glance, I thought: "hey, this is a great use for FLAC". Then I realized that because FLAC takes so much CPU time to decompress, CD players that could play it don't exist (if they did, they'd be more expensive). Just give me a standard CD and I'll rip it myself, thanks.

Re:I doubt it (5, Informative)

tuffy (10202) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660813)

I mean, at first glance, I thought: "hey, this is a great use for FLAC". Then I realized that because FLAC takes so much CPU time to decompress, CD players that could play it don't exist (if they did, they'd be more expensive).

FLAC actually takes very little CPU power to decompress; less than MP3, certainly. But they only compress to about 50% so a CD full of them could only hold two albums instead of one, which isn't gaining a whole lot. So I tend to leave my FLACs at home and convert them to something lossy to take with me.

Re:I doubt it (5, Interesting)

toddestan (632714) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660877)

It takes a high end 486 to a Pentium to decode MP3 files in the x86 world, yet there are MP3 players that last a long time on a single AA battery. All that someone would have to do is create a dedicated FLAC decoding chip.

Re:I doubt it (3, Interesting)

tuffy (10202) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660989)

All that someone would have to do is create a dedicated FLAC decoding chip.

That's probably overkill. FLAC decoding is all integer ops so you could do it on some cheap ARM chip without any problem. The ease of it is likely why FLAC is already supported [sourceforge.net] on various bits of hardware.

Re:I doubt it (1)

MukiMuki (692124) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661032)

What FLAC really needs is :

  • Multi-channel audio (up to 10 for audiophiles)
  • 24/96 support (it might already have this)
  • Full ID3-like info support, but with lyrics as well (might already have most of this, too)
Then all we need is an iTunes-like program that automatically converts a file on-the-fly as it transmits it to an audio device, with specific settings for each device. (e.g. your iPod would get a 256kbit AAC and your PocketPC would get a 96kbit wma, while brother's Rio Forge would get a 128kbit mp3, etc.)

read between the lines (4, Insightful)

ErichTheWebGuy (745925) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660753)

Sounds good on the surface. But this is only another way for them to force DRM down our throats to the point that we have no other choice but to either accept it or not buy music. My choice? Not buy music...

I'm also willing to bet Microsoft conveniently has patents on whatever technology would be proposed to "secure" the digital file.

Re:read between the lines (2, Insightful)

EnronHaliburton2004 (815366) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660878)

My choice? Not buy music...

There is always an alternative. Many smaller and fringe musicians, groups and labels have nothing to do with the RIAA or any sort of DRM. Alternative computer OS's will never force DRM upon you.

In my opinion, many of the non-mainstream groups produce better music. At the very least, their music is different, unique, and new to my ears. New is good.

If you want to listen to the Beastie Boys or Christina Agulera you'll have to deal with DRM. But there are always alternatives.

Re:read between the lines (1)

ErichTheWebGuy (745925) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661006)

You're absolutely right, and I mis-spoke. I meant not buy mainstream music. Some artists out there realize the great publicity value in being open with their music. I remember when Keoki released one of his songs on Kazaa his new album sold a lot more than his previous albums. That's hard to prove that it's due to Kazaa, but it certainly didn't hurt.

".no" format? (3, Funny)

FlunkedFlank (737955) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660754)

poor usage of an ellipsis in the submission ... I read it as ".no" format, thinking ".no" was some kind of new file extension.

.no (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660938)

That's the TLD for the country of Norway

Maybe in the future instead of buying CDs we will just go buy Norway?

Re:".no" format? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660939)

it took you time to figure out otherwise, and more time to waste posting a comment? want to do my taxes?

Re:".no" format? (5, Insightful)

Zycom (720889) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660970)

That's what they really want to give us. .no copying, .no sharing, .no moving, .no ripping, .no burning...

i hate it when (1)

halcyon1234 (834388) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660755)

They post articles that have news that's 3 years old.

At least, this is how I've been running my music collection for a long time now...

Re:i hate it when (1)

CRepetski (824321) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660844)

I think part of the reason it's posted isn't that it's "news", but in the sense that this information has hit a major, legitimate newspaper - The Washington Post (all bow to the great Post).

After all, the post does start with "According to the Washington Post". It's the news of the news that's the news, not the news that's the news.

Shoot... (5, Funny)

Avyakata (825132) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660757)

Now indecisive people like me will be completely immobilized...

m ... i don't know ... (3, Interesting)

GNUALMAFUERTE (697061) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660760)

A file format will _allways_ have to be involved, even what this people call "no format", will be a format, raw audio is also a file format, The point is that raw, uncompressed formats are not really very usefull to transfer over the net, compression is fundamental, unleast you want to remix it, or do some quality job over the audio, in which case, you need the full, uncompressed, high quality original, people will want a compressed, small format.

ALMAFUERTE

Re:m ... i don't know ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660917)

I think what they mean is a 'physical format'
ie. a box that contains what ever it is that you buy. They are simply saying that the next milestone will be complete online transactions [though I dont know what exactly is new in that!]

Re:m ... i don't know ... (4, Funny)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660922)

Nah, they'll just throw out random bits and call it music, atleast that's what they do nowadays

Re:m ... i don't know ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660954)

Yes but in the future, when internet connections are 10 times what they are now, that wouldn't be a problem. In the future when our hard drives are 10 times what they are now, that wouldn't be a problem. And so on..

Re:m ... i don't know ... (1)

xygorn (632847) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660964)

Well if the music were streamed to you directly as an analog signal, I don't think that would count as a file format. No file, therefore no file format... Then you could capture the stream and encode however you want. Although that is probably not what they are talking about.

Re:m ... i don't know ... (1)

vidnet (580068) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661050)

What's the difference between magnetic fields stored on platters and electromagnetic radiation stored in air? The latter is just a fancy type of delay line memory.

Ultimately you're wrong. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660993)

VERY wrong.

Few things computerwise are increasing faster than the capacity of bandwidth. Hard drives are outpacing CPU's, but bandwidth smokes them both. Compression will be VERY undesirable in the future. Something like music subscription services will probably rule the future. Purists of course will swear by the viceral pleasure of having the CD, but the convience of being able to get whatever you want streamed directly to the players of choice as desired will carry the day.

If I were Cingular, I'd try and buy napster or real, and look at adding a $5/mo option with a new 3 year agreement seeing if that washed out.

data file? (2, Informative)

Coneasfast (690509) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660762)

the consumer would buy is a data file

you mean raw pcm data, kinda like a wav file, or CD audio.

and you could create whatever you need

so basically encode into whatever format you want.
can't we already have this for quite some time now? most players play only mp3 and wma, so for now, you're stuck with those formats.

the CD will very likely be surpassed as the album format of choice.

you still need some media to transfer the original data. the CD will remain.

Re:data file? (2, Informative)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660966)

you still need some media to transfer the original data. the CD will remain.

Why do I need a physical medium to transfer data? I have cables and wireless connections for that kind of thing.

I read this, and it occurs to me... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660763)

The music industry would *LOVE* to get rid of the music CD, so I see this as a trial balloon.

CD's are great because they have really good quality music in non-DRM format.

Keeping the CD's lets you rip to whatever new format or device that comes along.

Think it through...CD's are the consumer's best *and only* friend in the music business right now.

Re:I read this, and it occurs to me... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660825)

The music industry would *LOVE* to get rid of the music CD, so I see this as a trial balloon.

CD is are great because they have really good quality music in non-DRM format.

Keeping the CD is lets you rip to whatever new format or device that comes along.

Think it through...CD is are the consumer's best *and only* friend in the music business right now.

Re:I read this, and it occurs to me... (1)

yeremein (678037) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661009)

CD's are the consumer's best *and only* friend in the music business right now

... Which is why the companies like Macrovision want to install malware [cdfreaks.com] on your computer to prevent you from ripping CDs.

Yeah sure (1)

Dragon Rojo (843344) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660780)

And for every format you want to convert the data file or if you accidentaly erase the file and nedd to download you'll have to pay some bucks.

Dirty Bastards!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660837)

It's like, like, when you break or scratch your CD and you like have to pay bucks for a new one. The public will like never accept such a pedestrian system. Those bastards are just like, trying to rip us off. Bitches!!! Like, dirty bastards!!!

what will it be next week? (3, Insightful)

DuctTape (101304) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660798)

I'm starting to get a little weary of these, "The Death of ..." articles. It'll happen when it happens. Or is it that the authors are hoping that the thing whose turn it is to be dying will die of this quasi-self-fulfilling prophesy?

Is there a place in my preferences where I can turn off viewing "Death of ..." articles?

DT

Re:what will it be next week? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11661002)

I'm starting to get a little weary of these, "The Death of ..." articles.

How about The Death Of "The Death Of.." Articles?

If music stores still exist... (2, Interesting)

mikael (484) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660802)

... maybe they will just be booths where you could have a CD/DVD/whatever burnt with the tracks of your choice and label printed out there and then.
It would certainly reduce the problems with shoplifting. Although you could do the same with a home PC if you had the bandwidth and a color printer.

Re:If music stores still exist... (1)

slinky259 (827395) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660905)

As far as I know, Best Buy already offers something very similar to that.

I don't know the details, but I saw something in a store once.

Re:If music stores still exist... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660908)

Um, so?

You can easily download Slackware, Fedora, Debian, Gentoo, etc for free. You don't have to buy anything. Does this mean nobody buys box sets of cd's for distributions?

no format? (2, Interesting)

all your mwbassguy a (720029) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660805)

i think what the article was trying to say was that in the future, we wont own a cd, or a tape, or an LP, we'll own a limited license on a song that we can use with the format of our choice.

RIAA (5, Insightful)

MagicDude (727944) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660806)

The death of the CD will come from RIAA tactics. Leave aside their random lawsuits of 80 year old grandmas, the reason people will stop buying CD's is because they are made to pay $20 for 15 tracks from an artist when only 1-2 of them are good. Back in the day when LPs were popular, you could buy a disc with just the one song you wanted. Now you're force fed tripe from the industry pushing their flavor of the month, big breasted, tiny brained, diva wannabes. Why would I want to pay $20 for a Jessica Simpson CD when there's maybe one track on there that I might like. Much better to be able to pay a buck and get the one song I want and put it on my Rio. That's actually another point, media size. When's the last time you've seen anyone walk around with a discman?

Re:RIAA (5, Insightful)

kasek (514492) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660863)

if you pay $20 a cd, you are buying them at the wrong places. If there are only 1-2 tracks you consider 'good', you must not care for the artist too much, so why buy the CD in the first place? I can't think of any CD i have bought recently where I didn't enjoy the entire CD.

if you are buying the flavor of the month pop garbage, it's your own fault for contributing to the studios coffers, so they can have someone new on the lineup next month.

Re:RIAA (2, Funny)

stinerman (812158) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660882)

I use a walkman, you insensitive clod!

Re:RIAA (2, Informative)

GoofyBoy (44399) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660919)

>they are made to pay $20 for 15 tracks from an artist when only 1-2 of them are good.

Thats the artist/producer control. Not RIAA.

>Back in the day when LPs were popular, you could buy a disc with just the one song you wanted.

You can do that today. Its called CD singles.

Example;
http://www.mattscdsingles.com/acatalog /Online_Cata logue_Jessica_Simpson_409.html

Re:RIAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660973)

CD signles and EPs are alive, it just seems they caught on and raised the price to stop this.

Re:RIAA (3, Insightful)

LocoSpitz (175100) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660994)

"Back in the day when LPs were popular, you could buy a disc with just the one song you wanted."

Well, as long as it was the single.

"Now you're force fed tripe from the industry pushing their flavor of the month, big breasted, tiny brained, diva wannabes."

No you're not. The industry has always promoted the artists it thought would sell big, regardless of quality. If you're too damn lazy to look for music that you like, that's your own problem. There are hundreds of CDs released each week, and any good music store has hundreds or thousands of CDs available for purchase. If you go online, you can purchase just about any CD you want. Quality music publications are available both online and off and are filled with reviews of a variety of albums. Take advantage of these resources and find music for yourself instead of complaining that the music industry is still promoting easy to sell artists after all these years.

Re:RIAA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11661019)

"Why would I want to pay $20 for a Jessica Simpson CD when there's maybe one track on there that I might like"

Wait...you like a Jesica Simpson song?

Dying? (1)

Leroy_Brown242 (683141) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660809)

Hmm, and to think, I just bought 3 CDs yesterday.

Proof of ownership (5, Insightful)

MiKM (752717) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660811)

The nice thing about owning the CD is it gives you proof of ownership (unless you physically stole it).

Re:Proof of ownership (1)

UID1000000 (768677) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660987)

You sound like a Microsoft customer. :) IE Proof of ownership (not the stealing part)

If that means better sound quality, great.... (4, Insightful)

slithytove (73811) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660824)

but, so far, all the major only music distribution has been in formats inferior to cd (probably all of it started out as the same bits as the cd release).
I buy loads of music, and have a reasonably high-end computer-as-transport, headphone rig to listen to it. But I've yet to buy a single track online because of the quality issue (and drm). I buy and rip around 10 cds a month. Its a pain in the a$$ for me to find the music that suits my eclectic taste in CD form and then rip it to .flac. I'd pay a little more than the cost of a cd to download the .flac out of a vast library including all the stuff I want and have yet to find. And it would cost the distributor far less as well.
If we could buy stuff in whatever format the artist wanted to output it in (pre-mixing/rendering even (opensource music)), the last remaining desire to have hard copy would be nullified for me:)

Could somebody explain .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660826)

.. how this data file would be any different from what you get nowadays when you buy a non copy protected CD? I can reencode that pretty much any way I like, with a minimum of fuss. That's how my iTunes library and iPod fill up, it'll be a cold day in you know where before I'm going to "rent" or "buy" music that's tied into some stupid DRM system. The only two things I can think of that would not be possible with a normal CD is (1) higher bitrates (and really who cares about that seeing that people listen to mp3's all day) and (2) choosing only the songs you want (lots of people would like that). All in all I'll be buying "normal" CD's for quite a while to come.

Sheesh (1)

AFCArchvile (221494) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660833)

This will have to be the data file format to end all data file formats, because otherwise there will be quality loss. Also, hard drives fail, and so on; what happens if the data file is lost? Will the consumer have to buy it again? Not to mention the murdering of the already lost language of cover art. Now there will be nothing but a line of text in Verdana (nice choice, webmaster!) to associate something visual with the audio. Well, that and the RIAA logo.

The advantage with Redbook is that it doesn't bite back. What happens if something embedded in this format does bite back?

A New Type of Store... (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660835)

That'd be pretty cool...

To prevent the industry (CD Retailers) from going entirely bankrupt though, perhaps the CD stores (current ones) could instead become "customizing stations", in which customers could request certain songs and have a professional (label, case, everything)CD made for them. Sure you could do it at home, but couldn't you always order a CD from Amazon? And since all the shop would really need is a burner, access to a database of songs, and a computer, it could be as small as a stall!

From the way I see it, the CD Retailers will:

A) Go out of business...

B) Take their shop online!

C) Merge with an existing online retailer (most likely)

D) Do the CD creation for customers by downsizing their shop to a music stall (in the mall).

Duh - CD format is exactly that (1)

HermanAB (661181) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660841)

already. Just a stream of samples. If you want to do anything else with it, you have to encode it. So what exactly do they want to change?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but... (1)

pyro jackelope (771283) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660853)

Am I the only one who thinks that's a bad idea? On the whole, making things more vague will filter out what in the long run may be a large group of users looking for something easy. Granted, converting files is easy...to most. We do however live in a world where if something like a website doesn't load in seconds, we start complaining, checking our connections, writing nasty emails, replacing stuff, etc., etc., etc. Is that really what we want in this case?

Um, hello! (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660856)

Thats what we have right now. CD audio is uncompressed and sampled at 44100 hz 16bit. Wee can do whatever the hell we want with it.

The only improvement to be made is to up the sample rate and bit depth.

The increased sample rate would more accuratly represent the music especialy at higher frequencys. This is because the nyquist sampling therom (1/2 sample rate = highest detectable freq) is a minimum requirement for capturing a frequency at that limit -- it doesn't mean that it's at all accurate.

The higher bit depth would give us more dynamic range.

This will never happen though. They want to lock us into DRM formats which will prevent us from ever getting to the 'raw' data.

Start buying CDs now! (2, Insightful)

bigtallmofo (695287) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660869)

In preparation for the inevitable collectors purchasing "classic" CDs, I would suggest buying CDs now.

Store them in your basement for about 10 years and make a killing on EBay!

Ring! Ring! (0, Troll)

OmegaBlac (752432) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660885)

Washington Post: Hello!
Year 2000: Hello Washington Post! We'd like our story back!

Really this is not news. Maybe a couple of years ago this would have been front page material but I guess its a Sunday and that excuses the posting of "News for Ners that just woke up out of a five year coma. Stuff that matters five years previously."

Re:Ring! Ring! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660931)

Dude, the 1990's called.. they want their joke back!

yeah, right (1)

rm999 (775449) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660886)

too bad a surround dvd-audio song takes up about 500 megs each. Maybe in 10 years... Also, too bad that the music-computer industry would never allow open formats like that to be sold.

No, the future of the music industry is closed, inconvenient formats and copy-protected discs.

Duh! (1)

Jozer99 (693146) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660887)

But in order to convert the DATA file to any format you want, it has to be in a format, after all, it is audio. Also, if they are going to make it easy to convert, then there would be a standard format to convert from.

Fine as long as lossless (3, Interesting)

PrayingWolf (818869) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660899)

Fine, as long as they still sell the lossless version for the same price as the lossy compressed one...
and to me even a high quality mp3 is lossy.

Knowledge (1)

delgertome (858944) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660930)

The problem I see in such a thing is that some people would have no idea how to do such things. My mom for one is still learning how to use MS Word. =\

Big on ideas, small on real info (2, Interesting)

highcon (857286) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660936)

There seems to be no real "meat" to this article, they talk about how we will get "raw data files" which we can encode to anything we want. That's really nothing new to me, and I get the feeling that the article is written for people who are not techinically inclined and don't care about the details (which basically renders it useless to me). I mean "the new format is no format, what we will get is a data file"...but what format would the datafile be in?

One interesting thing that the article almost hints at is a change in ideas about how music is distributed and musicians make money. The say that artists will make lots of different stuff (different tracks, videos, album art) available and you choose what to "consume". They don't however, say how this will be distributed, and this is an interesting thing to speculate on. I, for one, would be excited to see the music industry move towards a subsription based model, where you pay a fee to subscribe to your favourite artists and in exchange you get to download tracks, see what the artist has been up to, etc. (I'm not in the business of marketing, somebody else can figure out the details here). This would reward bands that have a loyal following and can keep people's interest for years, and eliminate the hype-marketing that is responsible for convincing so many people to buy crap music.

Dumbest quote... (2, Informative)

porcupine8 (816071) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660942)

In an article full of dumb quotes...

"If you just want to listen to music on your computer, think about what you have to go through to listen to that Ashlee Simpson song.

"There is a simplicity to the CD player."

Ok... So to listen to that Ashlee Simpson song on my computer using a CD, I have to either go to a store and buy the CD, or order it online and wait for it to get to my house. I also have to shell out $12-18 for the whole CD (depending on whether or not it's on sale), even if I only want that one song. When it finally arrives or I get home from the store, I have to break through the ridiculous wrappers they still use on CDs, pop it in my computer, and play it.

To do the same thing without a CD, I double-click on iTunes, click on the music store, enter Ashlee into the search box, scroll down to the song I want, click "buy now", wait a minute or two for it to download, then go back to my library and double-click to play it. If I want the whole album, I can click that instead for $9.99 and wait maybe 5-10 min for it to download, but if I just want that one song I can get it for 99c.

Where is the simplicity of the CD player again? Not to mention the fact that it first talks about wanting to listen to the music on your computer, then says the CD player is the simple part - but to do that, you go through the exact same steps listed above for listening to a CD on your computer, just putting the CD into the CD player instead of the computer.

Methinks the person quoted (a satellite radio exec) has no firsthand experience with this stuff.

Re:Dumbest quote... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11661007)

Ashlee Simpson
You forgot: place shotgun on floor, place toe on trigger, blow head off, at the end of both examples.

Re:Dumbest quote... (1)

porcupine8 (816071) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661017)

Well, I tried to ignore their taste in music and just focus on the rest of the idiocy.

Sell us the master recordings (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660944)

We can do our own mixing, converting, and storing.

Music Hell (1, Insightful)

Space_Soldier (628825) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660946)

Do you know when it will be music hell? It will be hell when you can only listen to music on a device like the iPod, where you pay a monthly fee, and you stream that music via a satellite. The service will only be by subscription only. There will be no CDs, no formats that you want, and no choice. The only way to get around this is to circumvent the hardware on that device and record the streamed music in whatever format you want. What if they make chips and memory cells that are sensitive to air? You'll have to open that device in a vacuum to record the music. How many of us have a airless room in hour house?

So... (1)

Pig Hogger (10379) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660955)

So, some joker is bound to make an Edison wax disk engraver, or a 78rpm engraver...

Wrong, wrong, wrong.. (3, Insightful)

adeyadey (678765) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660967)

Most ordinary people like the idea of buying something "real" - they will even collect the CDs/LPs of a band (sometimes buying the same recording again) just to have a complete collection. The most famous cover artwork is also a factor, an item people like to own, and have on their bookshelves. The old 33 LPs were superior in that regard- have a look at the prices people are paying for certain old vinyl LPs on ebay..

MP3/downloads-type purchases will saturate out at a certain level - the general public will always go for the "real thing", which will probably still be CDs for the forseeable future..

Well ... (1)

ggvaidya (747058) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661046)

Look on the bright side: if CDs do die, those who had bought CDs would have the antiques of the 22nd century.

"THAT's our family heirloom? A shiny disk with some blonde haired rapper's face on it? God, what was Grandad thinking?"

Magical data file ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660971)

Yes i'm sure this "magical" format-less data file will become very popular.

If by "data file" they mean raw uncompressed audio, then i doubt this article is accurately forcasting the future. Maybe they should've consulted with the EGGS [slashdot.org] before writing this story ?

This is Like the Move From Barter to Money (1)

fairyliquidizer (843205) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660983)

...hey lets stop exchanging commodities coz sometimes I would rather not carry a cow home just coz I sold you a load of wheat. How about I give you give me some bits of paper guaranteed by the authorities and I will get something I want later. Hey wait a minute, are you happy with not having a physical cow now? Sure. The CD is a comfort blanket dudes. The only benefits are: 1. no DRM 2. it can act as a backup The demise of the physical medium is inevitable. The question is what format will replace it and when. The challenge the internet gives (especially as it gets faster) is that with no controls piracy could become a genuine problem (it isn't IMHO today). We are all uncomfortable with this change as we foresee a world where we get WMA protection (and lossy compression) replacing the flexibility and fidelity of CDs. Personally I think Fairyplay shows that there is a workable happy medium. Decent fidelity and reasonable rights limitations. Although even AAC needs to be higher bandwidth than 128kbps before I would be comfortable saying goodbye to CDDA for full albums. I can tell the difference all too easily when listening through my Hi Fi. As for proof of purchase. When did someone last demand you prove that you didn't steal your music?

i dont think so (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11660985)

Downloading music and buying cds are two very differnt things. As the article mentions there wouldn't be anymore liner notes to flip through or pictures too look at. Those little pictures and blurbs about the recording are a major attraction for me and many other music listeners.

How are we supposed to get these magic swirling ones and zeros onto our computers or media manufacturers. Most likely downloading, and doing so takes away from music listening. When people start selecting which songs from an album to keep and which to throw away, I can't help but feel that it will encourage singles and one hit wonders. There is nothing like a complete album to listen to, all the songs in their entirity make a whole. How could you take any song out of the rock opera Tommy? Maybe with this generation of pop music buyers this idea will flourish, a new hit to download every week, and it's never played again. Quite an ingenious way to make the most money for the recording industry and little money for the artists.

Fuck clear channel and viacom btw.

Ummmmmmmm (1)

cwapface (835930) | more than 9 years ago | (#11660996)

That's what music CDs are for today. If I want an MP3, I make an MP3. If I want OGG or WMA or anything else, that's what I make.

When DVD-Audio discs become mainstream then nothing will change, just more options for how I want to listen to my music. What's the point of going to some mysterious intermeditary "data file" instead of just ripping it how you want it?

user friendly (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661000)

Not everybody is or wants to be computer savvy. I think something like the USB flash sticks would be a better consumer format than disks. For one, the "surface" of the data is not exposed, reducing read problems that were annoying with disk surface scratches etc. They just need to make the sticks a bit less fragile. They tend to crack in my experience because of all the wiggling needed to get it in place.

If internally something better than flash memory comes along, that is fine, but it should not change the interface of the object itself, and thus not making them obsolete. DVD's made CD's obsolute because the encoding mechanism was exposed. If we have a little box with ONLY the interface (wires) exposed, then how the data is written or stored inside the "box" becomes irrelavent, making obsolescence much less likely. As long as the stuff inside can deliver the expected/standard signal across the "plug" (USB interface in this case), then encoding density and data format is abstracted away and can grow over time without changing the "drive".

Isn't this all a bit premature (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#11661026)

The Mac Mini availability is contrained at this point. Making a Mac Mini into something that is not a Mac Mini at this point is really off putting to the rest of us who don't have a Mac Mini at this point.

The format of the future (1)

theclam159 (833616) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661029)

As hard drives, optical discs, and memory cards keep on getting larger and cheaper, we'll eventually just start using some lossless, 10.2-channel format that is sold on a future CD-type format at Best Buy/Walmart or through iTunes/Napster or through streaming services for your portable music player/computer. Since all the formats will be equal in quality (at the maximum quality of the human ear), an open standard will eventually emerge. Then everyone will just use that and forget about CDs vs MP3s vs OGG vs iPod vs iRiver vs WMA vs FLAC vs etc.

But DVD Audio and SACD have additional channels (1)

cshay (79326) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661035)

Some new file format would not help. The music must be remixed and resold to pull in the new channels. If you had Abbey road in 6 channels, you'd still have to buy it again to get it in 24 channels in 10 years. This article is silly.

I won't believe the music CD is dying... (1)

FusionDragon2099 (799857) | more than 9 years ago | (#11661054)

until it's confirmed by Netcraft.
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